Welcome to PortTalk


Welcome to PortTalk, our online consultation tool for connecting with people in the communities in which we operate. This platform provides a convenient way for you to take part in port-led consultations and ask us questions about port activities.

To find out more about operations and projects not in active consultation, please go to our main website.

PortTalk is hosted and administered by an independent agency on behalf of the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority, to maintain your anonymity. Click here to read the full privacy policy.


Welcome to PortTalk, our online consultation tool for connecting with people in the communities in which we operate. This platform provides a convenient way for you to take part in port-led consultations and ask us questions about port activities.

To find out more about operations and projects not in active consultation, please go to our main website.

PortTalk is hosted and administered by an independent agency on behalf of the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority, to maintain your anonymity. Click here to read the full privacy policy.

Thank you for visiting the Community Q & A. Your questions are important to us and we encourage you post your questions on any topics that interest you about the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority. You may also call us at 604-665-9004.

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  • Hello i live on the 2700 block across form Columbia containers. They slam containers all night long on and off of trucks and lights from the forklifts glare into houses. I am sure if you put your noise monitoring station right on their operation it would be way off the charts. They are not being good neighbours and this should not be allowed right beside homes at night. Please look into this. Thx

    tak asked about 2 months ago

    Thank you for contacting us.

    Our role as the port authority is to ensure the port operates efficiently and effectively for all Canadians. We recognize 24/7 port operations result in noise and other nuisances for people living nearby, and we do our best to mitigate these impacts where we can.

    Operations staff contacted Columbia Containers. The terminal advises there have been no changes to their business operations. We have asked that they take any steps possible to reduce noise and light nuisances, without compromising worker safety.

    We understand that living in close proximity to industrial facilities can be noisy and we continue to work with our tenants to address unusual noise incidents, and to find ways to help reduce the impacts of operations over the long-term, while still continuing to support Canada’s trade.

    We have registered your concerns. You can also review the data from the noise monitoring station adjacent to Columbia Containers online: https://sentinel.bksv.com/pmv/portmetrovancouver 

    Should you have additional questions, please don’t hesitate to contact us again at your convenience.



  • We are located in the 1600 block of Kitchener Street and constantly hear sirens on the waterfront. It can go on for quite a while, especially during the early evenings. Would you let us know what causes this? Thanks!

    pnewman asked about 1 month ago

    Thank you for contacting PortTalk. Worker's safety legislation requires that port terminals which have trains directly loading on to the terminals (the majority of terminals in your area) need to sound a rail safety siren whenever a train is moving on the terminal. The siren serves an important worker safety function to alert workers of moving rail cars, and helps to prevent accidents and fatalities. The work of railway workers can be dangerous. Nothing is more important to the railways and terminals than running a safe operation.

    To clarify our role in the matter, the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority serves as a federal “landlord” to the private terminal operators. Operational noise is one of the biggest challenges we face when trying to reduce impacts on residential communities adjacent to 24 hour port operations. The challenge with all the terminals is that they must have basic safety protocols to ensure worker safety and much of the noise falls into this category. We work with the terminal operators wherever possible to ensure that impacts on the community are minimized, including impacts from noise.


  • Hello, I live on the 2000 block of Wall Street, and I'm curious to know what is being built across the train tracks on the far side of Commisioner St. In that area. Thanks.

    DW asked about 2 months ago

    Thank you for contacting PortTalk. This proposed project is part of a number of construction projects (i.e. staging areas, worker transportation to construction site, parking etc.) related to the Trans Mountain Expansion Project. The applicant proposes to use the site to provide parking for construction workers. Employees will be transported from the Commissioner Street site to their construction project site via bus or water taxi. A flexi-float dock and gangway will also be installed at the site for a period of approximately 3 months for employees to access the water taxis. If approved, the resulting site set-up works would take place from mid-September 2017 for a period of 4 weeks. 


  • I'm looking for 20-foot railway containers from Vancouver to Toronto. Do you know who should I go contact with? Please reply asap. Thank you!

    SsSsS5698 asked 3 months ago

    Thanks for contacting PortTalk. As this is a domestic, overland shipment it is not normally something that involves a port authority. We encourage you to contact a container rental company, such as Cratex.

  • Hello, we are a newly established freight forwarding company in Vancouver and we would like to know more information about ways to communicate with the port, how to track the shipments entering Vancouver, custom clearance and specific regulations for handling the goods.

    tinat asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for contacting PortTalk. We encourage you to contact the Canadian International Freight Forwarders Association to find out more about freight forwarding.

  • This owner has a Loading dock in Richmond that fronts on the Fraser River and has an issue : A firm has tied up a log boom to a piling and it is intruding over into the owners water front designated lot area 495 , We are trying to find out who owns the log boom and arrange to have it removed per the system. Since it is restricting the use of the loading facility pier . - Per your Port Metro Vancouver manual - section 3.11.1 Movement and Control of floating property and booms. item 4 -" Where a boom or floating property is located in an unauthorized area which in this case was designated to the owner, the authority may move the boom .. to another location." or notify them to remove it within a designated period of time. ( I think it is 10 days) Your support is appreciated. 05 July 2017

    JBC asked 3 months ago

    Please contact Mimi.Chung@portvancouver.com with the exact location of your property and the log boom in question, and we will try to help you address this problem. Thank you for contacting PortTalk.

  • We are looking for guidelines regarding securing cargo to open flat rack containers. Sometimes flat racks arrive with integrated cargo straps, sometimes not. Likewise lashing points suitable for additional straps are in short supply, any advice on information resources, strapping systems, or container specifics would be greatly appreciate. Our cargo often travels by road and rail before arriving in port.

    Lucas asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for contacting PortTalk. Our Senior Account Representative would be pleased to provide some assistance to you. He can be emailed at doug.mills@portvancouver.com.

  • Hi Will you have a booth at RISI Transport Symposium?

    Leah asked 4 months ago

    Thank you, but we will not have a booth at the RISI Transport Symposium.

  • How can i know the port agent address because i want to send mail letter to the cruise ship for the crew member in ms nieuw amsterdam(holland america lines)

    Javie asked 4 months ago

    Thank you for contacting PortTalk. We recommend that you call the Destinations North America port agent at 604.641.1221, who should be able to help you.

  • Thank you for your response to (Steve1) I have some specific questions regarding this area, to ensure they are directed to the correct party can you be more specific (ie: map) Thanks Steve(1)

    Steve1 asked 6 months ago

    Please call 604.665.9075 and we can answer your specific question. Thanks.

  • Hi, I would like to know what authority is responsible for the planning and maintenance of the access roads to Fraser Surrey Docks. Specifically, tannery road-Timberland road-Robson road As well who is responsible for the rail traffic in the area.

    Steve(1) asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for contacting PortTalk. Tannery Road, as well as the northeastern section of Timberland Road, is on the City of Surrey's jurisdiction. The southwestern section of Timberland Road is on port authority land. Meanwhile, the rail traffic is under the jurisdiction of CN rail.

  • Hi, I was was browsing the Port of Vancouver website and reading through the land use plans. Are all the highlighted areas on the land use plan map owned by the Port of Vancouver? I am working on a school project and was wondering if there was a list of lands owned by the Port of Vancouver. Thank you!

    lb3232 asked 6 months ago

    Thanks for contacting PortTalk. From page 50 onwards of our Land Use Plan, you can see all the federal land that the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority manages. The port's federal jurisdiction includes thousands of different parcels of land leased to different tenants. These are the coloured on the maps.

  • i live off of Wall street in east vancouver and the port noises have increased in the last few months. I have lived here for 10 years and its never been this bad. a siren blast nearly all night. Why is that happening.

    JC asked 6 months ago

    Thanks for reaching out to us. Columbia Containers have recently begun the construction of their new grain elevator and silos, which may account for the increase in noise. You can find out more about the project here: http://www.portvancouver.com/development-and-permits/status-of-applications/columbia-containers-rebuilding-project/

  • While on the water February 2nd at night i observed an anchored deep sea vessel emitting a flashing green light on its radar arch. I've never seen such a navigation light before and was wondering if you could help me out in determining its use.

    joe_f asked 8 months ago

    Thank you for contacting us. Do you remember what ship this was? We would like to follow up with the ship's agent to find out more about the flashing green light, as international ships sometimes have different signals and uses.

  • It's 4am and I hear a constant alarm faint in the background. It's loud enough to keep me awake. Ive heard this before. It's constant and isn't going off. What the heck is this and how do we get you guys to turn it down?!! I live on Frances and Commercial.

    Siren asked 10 months ago

    Thank you for contacting us. The sirens coming from port terminals are routine and alert workers that a train will be coming on to the terminal. Due to the fact that the rail cars come directly on to the docks, the sirens serve a safety function to warn the staff to be extra careful about the moving rail cars. You can find out more about the ways that we manage port noise on our website

  • I found out AFTER buying a waterfront home in the District of North Van that there is a moratorium on recreational docks (for existing residences) which has been in place for 9 years now. After almost 6 years of living here, you can imagine my frustration, as I bought the property to be able to enjoy a certain lifestyle. Is there any change on this moratorium situation as of yet? (The last post on here was 8 months ago.) Why should the waterfront lifestyle that my neighbours enjoy be denied to my family? We pay our property taxes and all fees required of us. Am I at least allowed to share an existing dock with a neighbour (via mutal legal agreement/easement)? (Assuming a neighbour will even want to help this way!) If so, where can I find out more about this procedure? I am hoping somebody there will be compassionate toward a fellow taxpayer and human being, and put yourself in my shoes and offer me some help or advice. I just want be able to relax and enjoy some quality time with my family after working so hard to be able to live in such a beautiful area. Many thanks in advance. Looking forward to your reply!

    Nikki_F asked 10 months ago

    Thanks for contacting PortTalk. Unfortunately, the moratorium on new recreational docks continues. An application to share a dock with your neighbour would require a new joint application, which we cannot process because of the ongoing moratorium. We apologize for the delay and inconvenience it has caused you, and will keep you updated with any changes.

  • Dear Sir/Madam, Hi there. I am greeting you from Azerbaijan, Baku city. My name is Khudaverdi and I am almost 27 years old. I have finished petroleum engineering department in Azerbaijan state oil academy in Azerbaijan, Baku city and I am working in one of the British petroleum`s contracting company in my country, now. I am working at BP supply-port and responsible of the cargoes/units receiving and delivering to relevant disposal destinations. I know English and Russian languages very well. I want you to help me to come and work at your workplace and increase my future work career in port of Vancouver, Canada. I also can send my CV resume and other relevant documents for your attentions. Please help me in this matter and I will do my best to work very hard in your workplace and be a good worker there. I have got the IELTS (international English langauges testing system) certificate and this is because of tested my English ability. I am ensuring you that, you will say YES, while you interview me only one time. I hope you will read my email and reply me back as soon as possible. Thanks, yours sincerely, Khudaverdi.

    Khudaverdi asked 11 months ago

    Thank you for contacting PortTalk. If you are interested in careers at the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority, please visit the Careers section of our website.

  • I reside at 2277 Wall Street and I have noticed the demolition of the Worldwide Seafood. What is the plan for the future of that lot? When is demolition expected to be complete? Thank you!

    GD asked about 1 year ago

    Thank you for contacting us, and we apologize for the delay in getting back to you. There are currently no plans for the lot, as we have not yet received any suitable applications from potential tenants. The demolition of the building and restoration and remediation of the site is expected to continue until next summer.

  • My husband has got the letter from port authority of Canada. They asked to submit all the documents in original to get the port pass. If it is safe to submit all the documents in original.

    Inderdeep asked about 1 year ago

    Thank you for your question. Please contact the port pass office directly at MTSC_PortPass@portvancouver.com or call 604-665-9661 in order to ensure that your inquiry is answered correctly, as there are different requirements for different types of passes.

  • Is there any information available concerning the regulations around log boom storage on the Fraser River. Things such as where are the allowed/not allowed. How far into the river they can be. As a recreational boater there seems to be no places along the North Arm of the Fraser where a boat can stay for a couple hours without being hassled by tugs trying to put log booms in. I understand their right to work, and I do not want to get in their way, but they seem to claim ownership of the entire river at times. Just trying to get some clarification

    mpgyvr asked about 1 year ago

    Within the port authority's jurisdiction, there are certain areas that are designated for log storage. You can get a general idea of where the areas are by looking at the maps on pages 56 and 58 of the port's Land Use Plan. The areas shaded in light purple are designated for log storage. However, in order to store log booms, a company must lease the water lot from the port authority. To identify whether a waterlot lease exists for a certain area, we would need to know the exact location in question; you can contact us directly at 604.665.9075 for further information. Thanks again for contacting PortTalk.

  • I recently moved into the neighbourhood and I've noticed a persistent noise in the distance. At first I thought it was a neighbour's noisy clothes dryer but then I realized it never stops and it's coming from outside. What is this noise? It almost sounds like machine noise/a large fan?

    TVB asked about 1 year ago

    Thanks for contacting us. Can you let us know approximately where you live?

  • In response to your response about the lighting. Our building is located at 2211 wall st. @ McGill. These lights in question are relatively new, I believe the were either installed or turned on for the first time when the dredging was taking place. The building between us and the lights is the Worldwide Seafoods processing plant. And unfortunately about 2 stories to short of blocking out those lights. Cheers

    PatC asked about 1 year ago

    Hello Pat, thank you for your patience. We spoke to Viterra and the main lights you are seeing are connected to dredging work (removing silt/sand) in order to deepen the basin. This dredging work will allow for appropriate sized ships to dock at the terminal. The work will continue until the end of this week. Unfortunately, you will continue to see the same level of lighting at night until then. Once that work is complete, the terminal has agreed to try to dim lighting that may be occurring on their terminal from the ship loader. Let us know if the situation improves by the end of the week, and we will re-assess the lighting situation at that time. We hope you find this information helpful.

  • Why am I hearing an alarm today at 3:30 am? I also see a red flashing light from my home nearby.

    Marion asked about 1 year ago

    We have been advised by Cargill that an electrical fire occurred at their North Vancouver terminal last night, which resulted in the fire alarm sounding twice. All employees were safely evacuated.

    Health and safety regulations require that the fire alarm must sound at a certain decibel to reach all the employees on the terminal – including those who are working within the concrete silos. Regulations also require that the alarm continues to sound until the fire chief allows it to be turned off. Cargill Terminal regrets the disruption that this has caused to local residents.

  • New powerful lights making out apartments shine like daylight after dark. Why are the new lights put up on the east side of the port so bright? I understand the need for safety and all but there's no need to shine them in this direction. I'm currently using two pairs of blackout curtains after dark in order to make my bedroom dark enough to sleep in. I wish I could include a picture for you as the lights are never even turned off. It's 11 am and sunny, they're still on! Pat

    PatC asked about 1 year ago

    Thank you for contacting us. Can you please provide more information on your approximate address (e.g. cross streets), so we can better understand which terminal the light is emanating from?

  • Is there a place where all of the terminals are listed with their terminal depths? Thanks!

    Group Project asked over 1 year ago

    Thanks for your question. Here is a complete list of the terminal depths.

  • Do I need a port pass if I have a valid up to date British Columbia security worker licence

    Driver777 asked over 1 year ago

    If you are simply visiting the port, you can enter with just a valid BC Driver's License. However, if you will be working at the port or visiting regularly, you should apply for a port pass. You can find out more about the port pass on our website. Thanks for contacting us.

  • Is the port making any changes in light of the new SOLAS Verified Gross Mass requirements effective July 1, 2016? Thanks!

    Kim asked over 1 year ago

    As a result of the new SOLAS regulations, terminal operators at the Port of Vancouver will be requiring that all containers have a verified weight, and not just a declared weight. Any ship that is packed with a container without a verified weight would be violating international IMO regulations. More information can be found here. Thanks for visiting PortTalk.

  • hello I am doing a study on port regulations and such on fishing, im curious if the port of Vancouver has an fishing regulations?

    kfitzprport asked over 1 year ago

    Thanks for contacting us. Due to navigational safety concerns, fishing is not allowed in the inner harbor of the Burrard Inlet between the First Narrows and Second Narrows. However, fishing is allowed in all other areas of port jurisdiction. You can also review the Port Information Guide, which contains all the regulations of the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority.

  • ''Hi there, Our compaby is planning to import containers from Russia and rent warehouses close the port. We will export products from canada to the USA later. so I am wondering which ports are available? Where could I find more information regarding lease warehouses. Please advise. Thanks in advance. Cheers,

    dli asked over 1 year ago

    Thanks for contacting us. Although our real estate department normally deals with leasing opportunities, at the moment there is no warehouse space available within the port's jurisdiction. However, there may be space available in adjacent municipal areas. We encourage you to contact a commercial real estate firm such as Colliers or CBRE to find a suitable space.

  • Why continue an expensive inappropriate ad campaign . Are you not a federal agency?

    Bikk asked over 1 year ago

    Thank you for your feedback.

    Canadian port authorities are financially independent, receiving revenues from terminal and tenant leases as well as harbour dues and other fees charged to shipping companies. We do not operate on taxpayer dollars. 

    Our community outreach and advertising campaign forms part of the distribution of overall port spending, and is one of several initiatives to educate and inform the public about our mandate, operations and our place in the community. What we have heard consistently from the community is that people would like to know more about Port Metro Vancouver and our region’s maritime history. We will continue to use TV and other forms of advertising to share information with the community and answer questions.



  • An air raid type siren was coming from the port for about 2 or 3 minutes tonight (May 3) at about 10:30pm. What dies the siren signal? Also, can the protocols/bylaws related to trucks using Nanaimo Street north of Dundas be explained. Thanks Vanessa Geary 2411 Cambridge Street

    Vanessa Geary asked over 1 year ago

    The sirens coming from port terminals are routine and alert workers that a train will be coming on to the terminal. Due to the fact that the rail cars come directly on to the docks, the sirens serve a safety function to warn the staff to be extra careful about the moving rail cars. You can find out more about the ways that we manage port noise on our website

    In regards to your question about trucks, Nanaimo Street and McGill street are both part of the Major Road Network, which means that they are designated truck routes. However, any vehicle on Nanaimo St. must follow the City of Vancouver's truck traffic bylaws.


  • Hello, I live near Renfrew St. and Yale St. in Vancouver and I occasionally hear loud siren noises coming from the port anywhere from a couple minutes in duration and up. Should I be concerned for my well being? Are these usually emergency drills or if a siren begins to alarm, does that indicate an emergency (e.g. spill / leak of hazardous liquid / gas) has occurred? Thanks.

    Yale St. Rez asked over 1 year ago

    Thanks for visiting PortTalk. The sirens coming from port terminals are routine and alert workers that a train will be coming on to the terminal. Due to the fact that the rail cars come directly on to the docks, the sirens serve a safety function to warn the staff to be extra careful about the moving rail cars. You can find out more about the ways that we manage port noise on our website.

  • Hi there. I'm an employee of Intercruises. I'm trying to apply for my port pass for this year but whenever I go there... (terminal door j) The office is always closed!!! What are the hours of operations?? I even ask my employer for the hours. She sent me the calendar... Majority of the days the port office is closed.

    Jeanette Young asked over 1 year ago

    You can find out more about how to apply for a port pass on our website. The port pass office opens by appointment, and you can read the detailed instructions here.

    Please let us know if you have any further questions. The port pass staff can be contacted directly at port.pass@portmetrovancouver.com.


  • I'm interested in the ship named 'Pretty',which was recently anchored off North Vancouver. What does it carry and where is it now? Thanks.

    alinvan asked over 1 year ago

    Thanks for your question. The vessel Pretty is a bulk carrier which carries coal. At the moment, it is at Westshore Terminal in Delta, and its next destination is Turkey.

  • I live in south burnaby and notice yellow particles all over my car. I'm assuming it's from the sulphur pile in north vancouver. Since the wind can make it airborne, it is safe for the public to inhale it ? thanks.

    Van4life asked over 1 year ago

    Thanks for contacting PortTalk with your questions. Though the yellow speckles sprinkled around town this time of year may have the same hue as sulphur, you can rest assured it is actually pollen. Cottonwood trees and viburnum shrubs in the Lower Mainland are the biggest culprits for the yellow pollen we see from March to June each year. If you still have concerns, please do not hesitate to contact us at 604-665-9004.


  • Hello, Could you please provide an update on the expansion at Neptune Terminals? I understand that there had been an expansion recently and Neptune is planning another expansion since 2013. Is the expansion on hold, has some of it been completed (if so how much is left), or has it been concluded? Thank you!

    suneelmanhas asked over 1 year ago

    Thanks for visiting PortTalk. Ron Sander at Neptune Terminal would be happy to provide you with more information about the terminal's plans for the future. He can be contacted at rsander@neptuneterminals.com.  As a representative of the terminal, he is better positioned to provide you with information on Neptune's business development plans.

  • Any updates on recreational dock guidelines? The land use plan indicates this should be coming up. Thanks.

    billbar asked over 1 year ago

    Thanks for contacting us about the recreational dock guidelines. At this moment, the guidelines are not yet ready. We appreciate your patience - progress has been gradual, and for some people waiting to build new docks, the delay has been frustrating. There have been many different factors to review, and we need to make sure the guidelines are carefully considered before we can go forward. We will let you know as soon as we are ready to go forward and we apologize for the continue delay.


  • We have developed an environmentally friendly underwater hull cleaning reclaim system which can operate from the quay side. Not only does this machine remove and reclaim the fouling it also neutralises the invasive species through its filtration system, protecting the environment. Who can assist me with this possible implementation within the Port of Vancouver?

    Markrose123 asked over 1 year ago

    Thanks for contacting us with information on your new technology. Please contact anika.calder@portvancouver.com; she would be very interested in finding out more.

  • Who could I speak with about available vehicle storage space rental at the old Fraser Wharves compound?

    Jeremy asked over 1 year ago

    Thank you for your question. Currently, the Fraser Wharves site is fully leased and no longer vacant. If you are interested in sourcing an alternative location for space rental, the current spring 2016 Leasing Opportunities Brochure is available here, or please contact Jennifer Anderson at Jennifer.Anderson@portmetrovancouver.com for further information. 

  • Hello! As I currently understand it, the sand lot (not sure what to call it) at the southernmost end of No. 8 Road in Richmond is owned by the Vancouver Port Authority. It appears to be a popular place for off-road enthusiasts to recreate, however it is my understanding that they are technically trespassing. I have a number of questions regarding this land. 1. What are the potential consequences of operating a recreational vehicle there (fines, etc.)? 2. What is the current purpose of that land and are there any plans to change its usage in the future? 3. Is there a way for off road enthusiasts to continue to enjoy the land with permission from the Port Authority? What would be needed in this case? Thank you for taking the time to answer my questions.

    Christopher asked over 1 year ago

    Thanks for contacting us. You are correct; the lot at the end of No. 8 Road in Richmond is owned by the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority. It is zoned as “port terminal” in the Land Use Plan. The sand on the lot is currently pre-loading the site to help the ground to settle before development.

    We strongly discourage anyone from trespassing on the site and using the area for off-road recreation, due to safety concerns. We ask that you use purpose-built parks for off-roading, such as the Steveston Bike Park, or one of the nearby regional and provincial parks. Thank you again for contacting Port Metro Vancouver.


  • What is the history behind using large concrete caissons for the walls at Delta Port? and have steel options been considered that may be less expensive and show historically better seismic performance?

    StructuralSeismicCurious asked almost 2 years ago

    Thanks for your question. As you know, all three berths at the Deltaport container terminal are made of concrete caisson construction.  The same seismic criteria applies, regardless of whether the caissons are made from concrete or steel.  In this case, we chose to use concrete caissons because they are at less risk of corrosion than steel caissons in the marine environment. In addition, installing steel caissons pile requires a significant amount of pile driving, which would be unpleasant for surrounding neighbours.

  • I would like to know why you think it is necessary for the "Port" to advertise on TV? This seems like a colossal waste of taxpayer money. Are we the general public more likely to use the port given that they provide electricity to docked cruise ships. Are you kidding me! Based on the frequency of this commercial I would have to conclude that someone at the top has way too much ego and budget.

    Gordo21 asked almost 2 years ago

    Thank you for your feedback.

    Canadian port authorities are financially independent, receiving revenues from terminal and tenant leases as well as harbour dues and other fees charged to shipping companies. We do not operate on taxpayer dollars.  

    Our community outreach and advertising campaign forms part of the distribution of overall port spending, and is one of several initiatives to educate and inform the public about our mandate, operations and our place in the community. What we have heard consistently from the community is that people would like to know more about Port Metro Vancouver and our region’s maritime history. We will continue to use TV and other forms of advertising to share information with the community and answer questions.

    Thank you again for taking the time to write.

  • Very sad to see that the view from my favourite picture taking vantage point on False Creek is not blocked by some very ugly shelters on the new docks that have been installed by the dragon boats. I guess now that we have removed the industry from blocking the view of our precious waterways, we can now block them once again?...thank you someone!

    hemiVision asked almost 2 years ago


    Thanks for contacting PortTalk. The City of Vancouver manages False Creek, so they would be in the best position to let you know more about new structures in the area. Please contact them to find out more.

  • There is currently a very highly stacked container ship off the North shores winging at anchor. Just wondering what its status is and why it's waiting there so long?

    Curious Dave asked almost 2 years ago

    Thank you for your question. The container ship you are enquiring about is the Cauquenes, which is here for refueling and minor maintenance. It is our understanding that it is scheduled to sail within 48 hours.

  • Hello, I'm wondering who I can speak to regarding cruise ships and the impact they have on the local environment when they come into port! I'm a student at Capilano University studying the environmental impacts on the cruise ship industry and would love the chance to have a brief conversation with someone regarding the impacts and incorporating sustainable practices. Looking forward to your reply! Kelsey

    KelseySwanson asked almost 2 years ago


    Thanks for contacting us. The best place to go for more information about this would be the Cruise Lines International Association. The contact person is Donna Spalding, and she can be reached at dspalding@clia-nwc.com or 604.681.9515.

  • What is that noise that sounds like a phone off the hook?

    Sydney asked about 2 years ago

    Thank you for your question. Please call us directly at Port Metro Vancouver's community feedback line at 604.665.904 and we can work with you to try to identify the source of the siren.

    Operational noise is one of the biggest challenges we face when trying to reduce impacts on residential communities adjacent to 24 hour port operations. The challenge with all our terminals is that they must have basic safety protocols to ensure worker safety and much of the noise falls into this category.

  • What event is scheduled for Aug 31 -Sept 2nd at Canada Place?

    Ziggy asked about 2 years ago

    We don't have any specific events organized for August 31 - September 2nd, but two of our ongoing activities in which you can take part include:

    You could also check out the Vancouver Convention Centre's list of conferences.

  • PLEASE ADVISE WHY YOU HAVE NOT UPDATED CONTAINER STATISTICS TO SHOW JUNE AND JULY VOLUMES

    Emsley asked about 2 years ago


    Thank you for contacting us. The container statistics from 2008 to July 2015 can be found on this page: http://www.portmetrovancouver.com/en/about/factsandstats.aspx.

  • that siren, sun jul 26 around 15h28 is loud, i understand it is set at the minimum amplitude required to warn your workers, and that makes sense. i also understand that you had an acoustics test completed to provide the most feasible warning system for the safety of your workers, that also makes sense. what doesn't make sense is two fold. first the warning siren sounds like something out of a WWII air raid infomercial and second, you only bought one siren and decided it had to be loud enough to to hear across the port. a really excellent warning system would include more than one siren for contingency, and be directed at the warning areas from multiple sound sources in order to reduce the necessary amplitude and avoid alerting the entirety of burrard inlet that WWIII is nigh..

    okstupid asked about 2 years ago

    Thank you for your question. Please call us directly at Port Metro Vancouver's community feedback line at 604.665.904 and we can work with you to try to identify the source of the siren.

    Operational noise is one of the biggest challenges we face when trying to reduce impacts on residential communities adjacent to 24 hour port operations. The challenge with all our terminals is that they must have basic safety protocols to ensure worker safety and much of the noise falls into this category.

  • Are there any publishable timeframes for developing new guidelines for recreational dock applications? The moratorium has been in place for quite some time with few updates made available.

    deve asked about 2 years ago

    Thank you for contacting us about recreational docks.

    As you know, we have been reviewing our approach to recreational docks for several years with a goal of consistency and alignment with our new Land Use Plan and our Project and Environmental Review Renewal. During this time, various moratoriums have been placed on new recreational dock applications. We recognize and regret the inconvenience this may have caused.

    New recreational dock guidelines are being developed which will consider environmental impacts, marine navigation, safety, public access and existing best practices. In order to conduct our review and process future applications in a consistent manner, we are currently not accepting any recreational dock applications within our jurisdiction, including both single and shared docks. Any recreational dock applications currently under review are being processed.

    We will let you know when we are ready to start accepting dock applications, but unfortunately at the moment we do not have any publishable timeframes. Please accept our apologies for the continued delay.

  • I am looking at building a small float home by a builder in Delta and then getting it towed to the marina on Walnut Grove in Langley. My question is what is the process and cost to get a building permit for this float home? Will I need a City of Delta permit since it is being built in Delta? I called the city of Langley and they referred me to the Port Authority instead. Has anyone done this before? Any help would be much appreciated.

    FloatHome asked over 2 years ago

    Thanks for contacting us. The construction of residential structures including float homes is permitted by the municipality in which the building is being constructed. Delta’s Bylaw No. 6060 outlines that float homes are permitted by them. If a float home is subsequently moved to another municipality they may require an occupancy permit to be granted so you may want to ensure that the building meets both Delta's and the Township of Langley's building codes.

    If a float home is moved into a facility which holds a lease with Port Metro Vancouver, then the marina may be required to seek approvals from Port Metro Vancouver and marine surveys of the marina. We suggest that you discuss the requirements with the marina where you will be mooring your float home. Please let us know if you have any more questions.



  • Does Metro Port of Vancouver have a community meet up group that allows networking with people and businesses involved with the port?

    Cris asked over 2 years ago

    Thanks for your interest in Port Metro Vancouver. Both the Chamber of Shipping of BC and the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport have great events for people and businesses involved with the port. These events are interesting and are good networking opportunities. We hope to see you there soon!

  • How can Seaspan Vancouver Dockyard being running 24 hours a day and making a tremendous noise after midnight more than two weeks.!!! Just because it is located in Industrial Zone, so they can disturb our sleeping for granted! Yes, I understood that is a emergency repair for that big ship. That noise is so so so so loud so that we can not fall sleep at all , even all windows and doors are fully shut. It is summer here, do you know how hot gonna be when you fully close all windows and doors in order to reduce that noise. The worst thing is that we have to get up in the early of morning and work whole day without a good rest at night. We wish they could stop making noise for 7 hours at night and give us a quite environment to sleep!

    Orizon on 3rd North Vancouver asked over 2 years ago

    We apologize for the disruption and noise you have been experiencing. We've spoken to Seaspan, and they have let us know that the sandblasting of the vessel is now complete. The vessel will now be painted and is due to depart on June 18. Thank you for contacting PortTalk.

  • According your Noise Monitoring Program, dBA at St. George is consistently high as 67 to 71 ! It is almost 1am now. We really hope PMV can do something and reduce noise at night. Thanks.

    Orizon on 3rd North Vancouver asked over 2 years ago

    We apologize for the disruption and noise you have been experiencing. We've spoken to Seaspan, and they have let us know that the sandblasting of the vessel is now complete. The vessel will now be painted and is due to depart on June 18. Thank you for contacting PortTalk.

  • Over the last few years I have noticed how lacking Canada is when comes to sanitary pump outs even though federal regulations make it appear that Canada is serious about discharges. Washington State is decades ahead of Canada in terms of the number of pump out locations which most are free. With respect to Port Metro Vancouver and your Environmental policy, is there any consideration to install more facilities for the recreational boater? It would be an excellent public relations consideration; Nanaimo does have a floating pump-out barge. Would PMV take the lead and actively promote more locations for the little port users? If not, why not?

    A BC Boater asked over 2 years ago


    Thanks for contacting us about pump out stations. This summer, Port Metro Vancouver will be rolling out a safe boating campaign to better inform recreational boaters about the regulations surrounding grey water and sewage
    disposal. We will also be reviewing and providing information on the location of existing pump out stations. Please check back with our website at a later date for more information.



  • Is it possible for you to work with these companies ie GCT to force them to find alternate ways to communicate to their staff? A siren maybe the cheapest solution for the company, but by its very nature a siren is used in cases of emergency, not something that goes for hours and hours every day and every night.

    Shelley asked over 2 years ago


    Operational noise is one of the biggest challenges we face when trying to reduce impacts on residential communities adjacent to 24-hour port operations. The challenge with all our terminals is that they must have basic safety protocols to ensure worker safety and much of the noise falls into this category.

    Late last year GCT-Vanterm hired a third party acoustics specialist to conduct a noise study which included an assessment of other warning systems including a light warning system. The study found that other systems are not feasible to ensure worker safety and that the siren level is close to the minimum required for worker safety.

    You may also wish to contact the terminal directly. The terminal has asked I direct calls to Lori King, who is available by phone at 604-267-5200.

  • I can pick up port noise on microphone up by first and nanaimo without even trying. Trying to sleep with the constant noises, rumblings, vibrations and sirens is difficult. Sometimes when it's oddly severe I can hear the noise as vibrations through the pillow. Pretty crazy. What the heck are you even doing? Are you digging?

    cant_sleep_cant_live asked over 2 years ago

    Operational noise is one of the biggest challenges we face when trying to reduce impacts on residential communities adjacent to 24-hour port operations. The challenge with all our terminals is that they must have basic safety protocols to ensure worker safety and much of the noise falls into this category.

    To gain a better understanding of the existing noise environment, Port Metro Vancouver has developed a Noise Monitoring Program that will allow us to obtain and record existing noise levels and determine how much noise is attributable to port operations compared with other community noise sources. It will also help us to identify where there might be a noise problem and if we can make operational improvements to help reduce that noise. To learn more about the Noise Monitoring Program, please visit:  http://www.portmetrovancouver.com/en/environment/initiatives/noise-monitoring.

    For us to be able to try and identify the source of the noise you are hearing, it would be helpful to get more information about the timing and type of noise; please call us at (604) 665-9004 and we can discuss this with you.

  • On the Low Level Road why dont they have cones or somekind of deterant to stop drivers from useing that right turn lane as a means of lane jumping when the traffic is backed up during rush hour. I would like to see something put in place to prevent this from continuing.

    dan asked over 2 years ago

    Thank you for your question. In February 2015, Port Metro Vancouver, its Low Level Road Project contractor and the Safety Auditor reviewed the Low Level Road Project Safety Audit. It was determined by this review that the road meets the current standards established by the Transportation Association of Canada, and no additional changes are required.

    As construction on the Low Level Road is now complete, the road falls under the City of North Vancouver’s jurisdiction. If you have any further questions related to the Low Level Road, please contact the City of North Vancouver. For questions related to the Low Level Road Project, please contact us at your convenience and we would be happy to assist you. 

  • The sirens are unbearable. It is like a car alarm that goes on for hours I am lying in bed with earplugs in and I'm crying because I'm exhausted but can still hear the sirens. I live Lower Lonsdale area and this is siren is inhumane.

    Make_it_STOP asked over 2 years ago

    We apologize for the noise and inconvenience you are experiencing. Based on your location, we suspect the siren you are hearing is coming from Vanterm, a container terminal operated by Global Container Terminals (GCT).

    Late last year GCT-Vanterm hired a third party acoustics specialist to conduct a noise study which included an assessment of other warning systems including a light warning system. The study found that other systems are not feasible to ensure worker safety and that the siren level is close to the minimum required for worker safety.

    We will track your concerns and ensure these are included in my reports to management. You may also wish to contact the terminal directly. The terminal has asked I direct calls to Lori King, who is available by phone at 604-267-5200.

  • We're also in the commercial drive area.. the rail safety siren all night long is most disruptive to trying to sleep.. Random noises here or there are different. This doesn't fall in that category. It's pretty much always sounding. Please please come up with an alternative. It would be appreciated by so many people. Thanks

    Jessica asked over 2 years ago

    We apologize for the noise and inconvenience you are experiencing. Based on your location, we suspect the siren you are hearing is coming from Vanterm, a container terminal operated by Global Container Terminals (GCT).

    Late last year GCT-Vanterm hired a third party acoustics specialist to conduct a noise study which included an assessment of other warning systems including a light warning system. The study found that other systems are not feasible to ensure worker safety and that the siren level is close to the minimum required for worker safety.

    We will track your concerns and ensure these are included in my reports to management. You may also wish to contact the terminal directly. The terminal has asked I direct calls to Lori King, who is available by phone at 604-267-5200.


  • are there car rental facilities after disembarking cruise ship?

    kingman asked over 2 years ago


    There are a number of car rental companies that have kiosks at the Canada Place terminal.  Visit our website for more information: http://portmetrovancouver.com/about/cruiseandtourism/transportationandparking.aspx

  • My husband and I have lived at Commercial Drive and Frances for 6 years. It seems that in the last year or so a siren noise has been going off at all hours, but is of course especially noticeable at night. It goes on for hours at a time and can be heard throughout Strathcona as well. Our neighbours have noticed it as well. It can't be for an emergency, because it seems to be on all of the time. What practical use could an almost full time siren be? There must be a better and less damaging way to convey whatever message is trying to be conveyed. A light? A text?

    Catherine asked over 2 years ago

    We suspect the noise you are hearing is the rail safety siren at Vanterm container terminal, operated by Global Container Terminals (GCT). While the siren does serve an important worker safety function (it alerts workers of moving rail cars), we have heard from the community that it is excessive.  

    Operational noise is one of the biggest challenges we face when trying to reduce impacts on residential communities adjacent to 24-hour port operations. The challenge with all our terminals is that they must have basic safety protocols to ensure worker safety and much of the noise falls into this category.

    Port Metro Vancouver’s role is that of a federal “landlord” to its private terminal operators; however, we do work with our terminal operators wherever possible to ensure that impacts on the community are minimized (including impacts from noise). GCT-Vanterm is in the process of completing a noise study which includes an assessment of other warning systems including a light warning system. Early indications suggest that other systems may not be feasible to ensure worker safety. Despite this, management is aware and is working with the terminal on this issue with a long-term view.

    To gain a better understanding of the existing noise environment, Port Metro Vancouver has developed a Noise Monitoring Program that will allow us to obtain and record existing noise levels and determine how much noise is attributable to port operations compared with other community noise sources. It will also help us to identify where there might be a noise problem and if we can make operational improvements to help reduce that noise. To learn more about the Noise Monitoring Program, please visit:  http://www.portmetrovancouver.com/en/environment/initiatives/noise-monitoring

    Please contact community feedback at community.feedback@portmetrovancouver.com
    if you would like to be updated on this issue as new information becomes available.

  • Who owns Port Metro Vancouver?

    Vince asked over 2 years ago

    Thanks for visiting PortTalk. Port Metro Vancouver answers to the federal Minister of Transportation. The minister appoints the port's board members, based on recommendations from industry and government. All Canadian port authorities are financially independent, receiving funding from terminal lease agreements and fees charged to shipping companies that call at the port. For more information about how the port is run, visit our FAQ.

  • Hi, I live on Commercial near Venables. Since December, it seems that the noise level originating from the port is higher at night. It seems to start around 1-2 am and continue until at least the street noise covers it (around 6 am). Is there new activities going on at the port? Will this cease soon? Is Brüel & Kjær still monitoring the noise level so this can be recorded?

    Gen asked over 2 years ago


    Thank you for visiting PortTalk. Operational noise is one of the biggest challenges we face when trying to reduce impacts on residential communities adjacent to 24-hour port operations. The noise levels you are experiencing may be due to the terminals opening up night gates to relieve truck congestion during the daytime rush hours. It could also be due to temporary work taking place at Columbia Containers. The challenge for all our terminals is that they must have basic safety protocols to ensure worker safety. Much of the noise falls into this category.

    Please call us at 604-665-9066 and we can better help with pinpointing  the cause of the noise.

    To find out more about our Noise Monitoring Program, please visit:  http://www.portmetrovancouver.com/en/environment/initiatives/noise-monitoring

  • My recent move to the Lower Lonsdale area has been marred by the serenade of sirens - which, I am told, by my new long-suffering neighbours, originates from the port. What is the cause of this?

    Kevin in North Van asked over 2 years ago

    Thank you for visiting PortTalk. We suspect the noise you are hearing is the rail safety siren at Vanterm container terminal, operated by Global Container Terminals (GCT). The siren serves an important worker safety function in alerting workers of moving rail cars. GCT-Vanterm is in the process of completing a noise study which includes an assessment of other warning systems including a light warning system. Early indications suggest that other systems may not be feasible to ensure worker safety. Despite this, management is aware and is working with the terminal on this issue with a long-term view.

    Port Metro Vancouver’s role is that of a federal “landlord” to its private terminal
    operators. However, we do work with our terminal operators when possible to minimize impacts, such as noise, on the community. Operational noise is one of the biggest challenges we face when trying to reduce impacts on residential communities adjacent to 24-hour port operations. The challenge for all our terminals is that they must have basic safety protocols to ensure worker safety. Much of the noise falls into this category.

    To better understand the existing noise environment, we developed a Noise Monitoring Program that allows us to record existing noise levels and determine
    how much noise is due to port operations compared to other community noise sources. It will also help us to identify where there might be a noise problem and if we can make operational improvements to help reduce that noise. To learn more
    about the Noise Monitoring Program, please visit:  http://www.portmetrovancouver.com/en/environment/initiatives/noise-monitoring

    Please contact community feedback at community.feedback@portmetrovancouver.com if you would like to be updated on this issue as new information becomes available.



     

  • I have clients departing the Canada Place Pier on 08/30/15 on Amtrak on the evening train to Seattle. They want to store luggage when they disembark the cruise ship and take a tour of Vancouver for several hours. Is there a place to store luggage for the day? Or a tour company that will help with their luggage.

    Karyn asked almost 3 years ago

    Thank you for your question. During cruise ship season, CDS Baggage will hold luggage until 4:00 p.m. Another option is Westcoast Sightseeing, a company who could help them with tour options as well as help storing luggage.

    These links, along with other information that may be helpful to your clients, can be found on our website here

  • Which port has more sulphur, north vancouver or port moody?

    mishy asked almost 3 years ago

    Thank you for your question. Pacific Coast Terminal in Port Moody generally handles marginally more sulphur than Kinder Morgan Vancouver Wharves in North Vancouver, depending on market conditions. 

    If you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to contact us and a Port Metro Vancouver team member will be happy to assist you. 


  • Dear TLS Just have the following questions regarding the reform: 1. when will the transition program start? 2. what kind of information is required from the independent operators in order to receive the cash payment ? 3. Once my independent operators accept the program and want to return as an employee, does that mean I can add more trucks to my exist TLS for those ex-independent operators ? 4. When can I add more trucks to the fleet when the independent operators are gone ? Thank you very much ! Jacky Sun

    JackySun asked almost 3 years ago

    1. The final consultation round will take place November 4 – 17. Following the consultation period, Port Metro Vancouver will finalize the new TLS policy. We anticipate that we will begin accepting applications for the new TLS policy the week of November 24; companies and sponsored owner operators that meet the new entrance requirements will be approved between November 24 and January 31, 2015 for an effective date of February 1, 2015. Current TLS Independent Operators holding valid Permits will be eligible for the Transition Support Program; determination of individual the cash payment amounts will be made after February 1, 2015.

    2.  Final details on the Transition Support Program will be finalized after the consultation period ends (November 17). We will advise the drayage community as soon as we can.

    3.  Final details on the new TLS Policy will be finalized after the consultation period ends (November 17). We will advise the drayage community as soon as we can.

    4.  Final details on the new TLS Policy will be finalized after the consultation period ends (November 17). We will advise the drayage community as soon as we can.


  • I've been watching this organization finesse the coal port decision with a cynical process that didn't listen to people, local governments and its scientific and regulatory entities. No one is in favor of this except some dark unseen beneficiaries known only to you and your cronies. You have immunity from the elective democratic process. All jurisdictions in the US listened to their constituents and turned down port applications. We hapless Vancouver urbanites are at your mercy. At the very least we Vancouverites will be subject to particulate coming the burners of this dirty, polluting fuel in China, a place that is already an ecological disaster. You say that is none of your business. Unfortunately, the planet is a small one, and we can't endlessly degrade the fragile ecosystems that make it a friendly place for us to thrive. My question. How many dollars will this add to the BC GDP? Can we all see the economic case for this? I got that there will be 25 jobs, so we can start with $2.5 million. What other fees are coming into the province and municipalities? I know there is no economic case for mining this coal, that it is the beneficiary of government subsidies, thanks to it's strong lobby. What is the economic benefit to the province, quantified in dollars per year?

    Westcoaster asked about 3 years ago

    Thanks for visiting PortTalk. Port Metro Vancouver recognizes that many people have concerns about the types of commodities traded through the port. As a port authority, it’s Port Metro Vancouver’s role to facilitate Canadian trade and to ensure safe and efficient movement of domestic and international trade. Coal has been safely handled by Port Metro Vancouver marine terminals for decades. Exports are federally regulated and more information can be found on specific goods and technology exports from Canada in Canada’s Export Controls Guide on the Government of Canada website. The decision on what goods Canada trades is beyond the scope of a port’s jurisdiction. The debate about which commodities Canada trades should take place between citizens, communities and their respective governments.

    Coal has long been the port’s principal export, and accounts for more than one-quarter of the port's total volume each year. In 2013, Port Metro Vancouver handled more than 135 million metric tonnes of cargo, including more than 38.1 million metric tonnes of coal. Of that, 68 per cent of the exported coal exported was metallurgical (25.9 million metric tonnes) and 31 per cent was thermal (11.9 million metric tonnes).

    In B.C., the coal industry generates $5 billion in economic activity annually. The coal supply chain is responsible for more than 26,000 jobs in the province (from mining to terminal jobs). The average job in the coal industry pays $107,000 a year, making it one of the highest-paying sectors in the province. For additional information on the coal industry in B.C., see the Coal Alliance website.

    With regards to your question around the business case for the Fraser Surrey Docks project, Port Metro Vancouver cannot speak for the business decisions of tenants and terminals, and the proponent assumes full responsibility for the risk of any business decision. Port Metro Vancouver does not review the business case or GDP revenue as part of the permitting process. The focus is on assessing the physical impacts of the project. More information on Port Metro Vancouver’s Project Review Process can be found on our website.


  • I see you refer to each vessel calling at the port of Vancouver being 'guided' by a pilot. Actually this is not true.The pilot is there merely to 'give the Master advice' and it is the master who is responsible for guiding his vessel into port. This arrangement is logged as the vessel proceeding under Master Orders & Pilot's Advice Mr. Know-it-all

    anonymous asked about 3 years ago
    Thanks for visiting PortTalk. The Pilots on board vessels use their knowledge of local waters to safely guide vessels to their destination, and guide the Master of the vessel through local waters. The Master is responsible for the vessel, however works closely with the Pilot. In most cases, when the Pilot is on board, he or she has control of the vessel and gives orders directly to the helmsmen, with the Master and bridge team monitoring the passage.
  • Does the PMV have a signed agreement with the City of Vancouver giving them jurisdiction over the foreshore? Currently the City of Vancouver enforces their Bylaws below the high tide mark. Who has jurisdiction?

    anonymous asked about 3 years ago
    Thanks for visiting PortTalk. It depends on the area, and the bylaw. Port Metro Vancouver does lease the foreshore to municipalities in areas such as parks, or other places such as False Creek. In general, the thin red line on our jurisdiction map denotes port jurisdiction. Can you more specific in your question?
  • Who can do anything about dumping sewage in False Creek?

    PMVAdmin asked about 3 years ago
    Thank you for your follow up question. The Vancouver Police Department (VPD) Marine Unit, along with the Coast Guard and Environment Canada, is responsible for patrolling False Creek. Dumping sewage is a violation of city bylaws and can be reported by calling VPD Marine at 604-817-1946. You can also notify the Coast Guard at offshore@rmic.gc.ca. For a ticket or fine to be issued, the incident must have been witnessed and recorded. Please provide as much information as you can about the date, the time, and the vessel in question. If you have any other questions, please let us know.
  • Who has jurisdiction over the boats that are moored in False Creek?

    anonymous asked over 3 years ago
    Thanks for visiting PortTalk. The City of Vancouver has jurisdiction over the boats moored in False Creek. Port Metro Vancouver's navigational jurisdiction begins on the west side of the Burrard Street Bridge.
  • Before construction started on the Low Level Road in North Vancouver I asked Port Metro Vancouver if bicycle access would be maintained throughout construction on the Low Level Road. I was assured the answer was yes. However, the truth is the direct opposite. Tremendous energy has been put into trying to stop cyclists with multiple signs. Even now with almost no construction occurring along the road itself, the signs persist (when it would be easy to remove the pylons and still have a bike lane eastbound). This entire process is actively discouraging cyclists and would-be cyclists in North Vancouver. Or is the purpose here actually to get them off the road so trucks have easier access to the Port? There are far fewer cyclists commuting east-west this summer than previous summers. And who wouldn't be put off by the prospect of the 3rd Street hill looming above you. I just hope that once this fiasco of a project is completed cyclists are welcomed back on to the road with new and improved bicycle lanes along the Low Level Road (hopefully separated from traffic). Engineers and planners need to remember that unlike cars, cyclists are always going to choose the lowest elevation route. cc: City of North Vancouver Sincerely, Randy Burke

    anonymous asked over 3 years ago
    Thank you for contacting us. Our commitment to provide passage to cyclists in a safe manner is a top priority. However, we understand that in doing so, cyclists have had to alter their travelling routes during construction.

    For safety reasons, cyclists will be required to continue to use the alternative cycling routes until the project is completed. At this time, there are temporary construction detours in place at the west end and east end of Low Level Road, which do not provide sufficient road width to safely accommodate cyclists.

    Once the Low Level Road is completed and opened to cyclists, you will have access to the new and upgraded bike lanes. We note that the new bike lanes will be a minimum of two metres wide, providing greater separation for road traffic and trains. The new bike lanes were designed to consider the needs of all users, as well as road height constraints. Adding a physical barrier between cyclists and vehicles was considered, however, a barrier would limit the use of the bike lanes as a vehicle pullout in the event of a breakdown or emergency, compromising safety and road efficiency. Cyclists who wish to ride away from traffic will be able to travel along segregated bike routes via the new Spirit Trail.

    We appreciate your continued patience as we complete this work. If you have any further questions or feedback, please feel free to contact us. A member of the project team would be pleased to assist you.
  • We are from Australia and are going on cruise in 5th September 2014. The Ship "Rhapsody of the Seas". Question from which port will this ship leave from? Will it be from Canada Place or Ballantyne? If its from Ballantyne Pier how do you get to Ballantyne peir? We were told it will be Canada Place but we have found it may leave from Ballantyne. Is there a shuttle that can take you from one terminal to the other? Thank you for your help. Jenny Gearing

    anonymous asked over 3 years ago
  • What is going on with that cruise ship ?- off the usual route never seen one in that situation /

    marquerite asked over 3 years ago
    On Wednesday May 27 the Regatta vessel moved from its berth at Canada Place to Vancouver Dry Dock for routine maintenance. In order to do that, it was maneuvered with tugs in the mid-harbour on the North Shore side to be positioned for floating into the dry dock. Every cruise ship has a BC Coastal Pilot on board to guide the vessel before it enters Port Metro Vancouver.
  • A quick feel good topic. I want to see the Celebrity Solstice go under the Lions Gate Bridge for the first time on the 8th. I understand that part of it's structure has been modified to allow passage. I live out in the valley so I need a time (close to) when it will reach the outer harbour and then proceed. So I can get into town and into a good position for photographs. Will low tide play a factor?

    anonymous asked over 3 years ago
    The Celebrity Solstice is scheduled to berth at Canada Place on May 8th at 7:00 a.m. which means it will likely pass under the Lions Gate Bridget at approximately 6:00 a.m. It is scheduled to depart at 5:00 p.m. and would pass under the Lions Gate Bridge shortly after. Access under the bridge will depend on several factors that affect bridge height. These factors include tide levels, number of trucks and vehicles on the bridge at the time, and temperature. Port Metro Vancouver’s Harbour Master provides approval for vessel passage as does the Pacific Pilotage Authority, which is responsible to guide the vessel under the bridge and must approve its transit. Thank you for getting in touch. If you have any further questions, please feel free to contact us.
  • My husband has been riding his bike and successfully navigating the area around third st and into the park. yesterday he encountered a spilled sandbag(used to contain a barrier) all across the tarmac.- western end of the spirit trail entrance into Moody Park Unfortunately he skidded on the sand, damaging both his thigh and arm (quite painful) and damaging his bike. Please ensure this area has been checked and cleaned up as we would not want another cyclist to encounter this

    anonymous asked over 3 years ago
    Thank you for bringing this to our attention. Safety is our highest priority on the Low Level Road Project and there has been multiple contractors working in this area. We have followed up with our Contractor to address this matter and have asked that they ensure the cycling path is monitored daily for debris and residual construction materials, as we share your concern and would like to avoid an incident like this from happening again. We would like to take this opportunity to remind users of the Spirit Trail that during ongoing construction, to exercise caution and reduce their speed through this area. If you have any additional questions or concerns, a member of our Project team would be happy to assist you.
  • Where can I find an up-to-date plan-view drawing and an artist's conception for the Low-Level Road project, including all the upgrades to the terminals?

    Neil asked over 3 years ago
    Thank your for your question and your interest in the Low Level Road Project. There is a video on the Low Level Road PortTalk page that shows an artist’s rendering of the preferred design. You can view it here. Project information, including design alignments and renderings can also be found here. In addition, photos of construction progress on the project are available in the images section of the Low Level Road PortTalk page. There is a view assessment for Richardson Terminal available in the appendix of the following report on the Port’s website. Neptune and Cargill terminals are not expected to have significant changes in appearance; however, you can learn more by visiting our website’s Ongoing Projects page. If you have any additional questions, a member of our Project team would be happy to assist you.
  • This email is a follow up to the question I asked yesterday regarding the new use of the former Fraser Wharves land. I note from a posted sign that the site is a Canadian Customs Sufferance Warehouse. In this regard, would you kindly respond to the questions below. Who is the operator of the warehouse? What type of designation does this warehouse hold? What is the projected time frame for the land to be used in this manner? Will all containers arrive and leave by tractor-trailer or will there also be rail freight and direct off loads from marine traffic ? Is this a 24 hour operation? What is the expected or maximum number of containers allowed on the site? Is this warehouse replacing a previously designated warehouse; if not where would these containers have been stored before? In addition, what is the use of the land closer to no. 6 road? Will new cars continue to be stored here? If so, who is the operator? Thank you. I am posing these questions as a curious neighbour.

    Winnie asked over 3 years ago
    Thank you for your patience while we gather information to respond to your questions. Port Metro Vancouver has issued a short-term lease to Harbour Link Container Services to temporarily use the Fraser Wharves site to assist with clearing the back logged containers that occurred as a result of the recent trucking strike.

    The designation for the site that you are referencing is industrial. The containers are transported to and from the site by truck only. The approximate expected number of containers allowed on the site is 800. In addition, Harbour Link’s operations will occur during regular daytime hours.

    To clarify, the permit allows for storage of loaded containers, not for a warehouse, and the site is an addition to storage capacity that is provided at the four regional container terminals.

    Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics (WWL) uses a portion of the property southwest of No. 6 Road for new vehicle imports. WWL will continue to use this section of the property for new vehicle handling. The remaining portion in the southwest area of the property is currently vacant. The property located northeast of No. 6 Road will be used for container storage on a short-term basis.

    The urgent need for short-term storage of containers during the recent trucking strike necessitated the use of this property for the purposes mentioned. We appreciate that future uses of this property are of interest to the community. Your comments continue to be important to us and we will make a concerted effort to notify you and your neighbours about this property.

    Additional information is available in a recent Community Bulletin available on PortTalk. If however, you have any further questions about this property or Port Metro Vancouver, please contact us. A project team member will be happy to assist you.
  • Would you please tell me how the Port will be utilizing the former Fraser Wharves site. There appear to be changes today, April 2, 2014. Thank you

    Winnie asked over 3 years ago
    Port Metro Vancouver purchased the property in March 2013. Fraser Wharves Ltd. vacated the property at the end of January 2014 and as of February 2014 WWL Vehicle Services Canada Ltd. leases a portion of the property for receiving, shipping and handling automobiles. We will consult with all potentially affected stakeholders on the future use of this property through the current process to update the Port's Land Use Plan, including the Port’s intended long-term future use. For more information on our Land Use Plan process please visit: http://porttalk.ca/landuseplan
  • The website talks about gabions, caissons and habitat benches being placed under water for animals to colonize. Do these structure also serve some other purpose or are they created solely for the purpose of marine life habitat?

    Parka asked over 3 years ago
    Rock gabions and caissons are commonly used in infrastructure to prevent erosion and to build piers and platforms. In some places in the Port such as Centerm Terminal, rock gabions are placed specifically for the purpose of providing sub-tidal fish habitat features. In other places – such as Deltaport – we modified the caissons used during construction to incorporate habitat features. These changes can include creating holes and openings that provide shelter and habitat for fish, or even building a “habitat skirt” on which seaweed can grow. We do this in order to help compensate for losses in fish habitat caused by terminal construction and other port activities. There are a variety of different habitat types which have been created as a means of other habitat compensation measures including marsh benches and artificial reefs. If you go to our online Land Use Plan map at https://portmetro.ourcommunitymap.ca/porttalk#, you can see where we have created habitat compensation areas. They are identified in green in the legend.
  • At Surrey council tonight, will CEO Robin Sylvester explain why the Port is still committed to the Fraser Surrey docks coal proposal if 3500 people have written comments expressing opposition while less than 10 are in support? Considering that every local government, our provincial health officers and many scientists have called the HIA conducted by SNC Lavalin at least inadequate, will the Port start over and conduct an independent appraisal of the proposal?

    anonymous asked almost 4 years ago

    Thank you for your question. Robin Silvester answered your questions on January 13, 2014, at the Surrey Council meeting. His answers were as follows:

    Port Metro Vancouver is currently reviewing the proposed Fraser Surrey Docks project and the Port is continuing to work with FSD on the feedback received up to date.

    Port Metro Vancouver is the regulator responsible for reviewing the Fraser Surrey Docks proposal to ensure that all environmental, safety, and community impacts are appropriately identified and addressed. As part of the permitting process, we take into account and assess for health impacts and refer to the local Health Authorities when appropriate. We have been in communication with the local Health Authorities and will continue to work together. The Port has heard a lot of feedback so far, and takes all feedback received into careful consideration.

    All public and agency comments have been posted on PMV’s website following the closing of the 30-day public comment period. The FSD EIA is also still available for information on PMV’s website. Please continue to check our website for further updates.

  • Will Robin Sylvester speak about the Port's long-term plans for the Fraser Surrey Docks facility at Surrey council tonight? Seeing as how the Port has said that FSD is getting out of the container business, what is planned for the facility? http://youtu.be/M258av587fc

    anonymous asked almost 4 years ago

    Thank you for your questions. Port Metro Vancouver’s mandate is set out in the Canada Marine Act. We are responsible for facilitating the movement of Canadian imports and exports in support of the Government of Canada’s trade priorities, and for the safe and efficient movement of marine traffic.

    With the update of the Land Use Plan – which will be open for public comment in early February – the designation of the Fraser Surrey Docks facility is not expected to change. We encourage you to participate in the upcoming Land Use Plan consultation in February/March to learn more about the new plan and proposed designations. For more information about the Land Use Plan consultation please check our website.

    Port Metro Vancouver is currently reviewing the proposed Fraser Surrey Docks project and the Port is continuing to work with FSD on the feedback received up to date. Port Metro Vancouver is the regulator responsible for reviewing the Fraser Surrey Docks proposal to ensure that all environmental, safety, and community impacts are appropriately identified and addressed. As part of the permitting process, we take into account and assess for health impacts and refer to the local Health Authorities when appropriate. We have been in communication with the local Health Authorities and will continue to work together. The Port has heard a lot of feedback so far, and takes all feedback received into careful consideration.

    All public and agency comments have been posted on PMV’s website following the closing of the 30-day public comment period. The FSD EIA is also still available for information on PMV’s website. Please continue to check our website for further updates.

  • Is it correct that the Port Authority plans to build a caustic/hazardous chemical terminal at the former Fraser Wharves site in Richmond. I look forward to your prompt reply.

    anonymous asked almost 4 years ago
    No, that is not correct. Port Metro Vancouver will consult with all potentially affected stakeholders on the future use of this land. Please contact us if you have any further questions.
  • Now that Fraser Wharves is no longer operating the terminal on Steveston Highway what are the Port's plans for this property? I live in Watersone Pier, right next door.

    Winnie asked almost 4 years ago
    Port Metro Vancouver purchased the property in March 2013. Fraser Wharves Ltd. will be vacating at the end of January 2014. The Port reached agreement with WWL Vehicles Services Canada Ltd. to lease a portion of the property starting this February for receiving, shipping and handling automobiles. We will consult with all potentially affected stakeholders on the future use of this property through the current process to update the Port's Land Use Plan, including the Port’s intended long-term future use. For more information on our Land Use Plan process please visit: http://porttalk.ca/landuseplan
  • We must reduce Vancouver’s port generated traffic, not increase it. With an abundance of coastline why ship coal, grain, oil, containers in transit, etc. through the Lower Mainland? Would it not be prudent to explore port capacity along the hundreds of kilometres of coast north of Vancouver?

    Nick Loenen asked almost 4 years ago
    Port Metro Vancouver is the most diversified port in North America and a major contributor to the local and national economy. In large part, our success is attributable to our geographic location on the West Coast of Canada. Within Port Metro Vancouver, we have deep water, connections to required road and rail infrastructure, an established supply chain, access to skilled labour, and a local market for goods. All of these elements are required to sustain an economically competitive port that minimizes the environmental footprint of moving goods. Any other locations along the coast of British Columbia that meet these requirements are either in the planning stages or have already been developed. Prince Rupert is a great example of a BC port that has leveraged its geographic location to facilitate continued growth across a range of commodities. Thank you for taking the time to write to us.
  • Please tell me why you find it necessary to advertise the Vancouver Metro Port on television. It seems to me you have a monopoly on the port business in this geographic area. Listening to feel good, expensive, rubbish like that is like listening to BC Ferries advertise. It's a waste of breath. Are you facing competition from the consumers watching your ads? Your job is to run the port. We don't need you to tell us how wonderful you are.

    anonymous asked almost 4 years ago
    Thank you for question. Our advertising campaign is one of several Port initiatives in response to requests from the community for more information about Port Metro Vancouver and our region's maritime history. The current advertising campaign is a continuation of advertising the Port has been doing for some time. In addition to advertising, we have increased our social media engagement, launched a mobile app, and created new videos that tell real-life stories of people in our communities and their connections to the Port. We will also continue to use PortTalk.ca as a means to share information with the community and answer questions. If you have any more questions, please let us know.
  • Ten nights ago a train blew its' whislte 40 times at midnight. One night of peace, then the next night it was a ship in the harbour blowing away at 6am. The next three nights I heard train whistles around 5am...loud and sustained. Last night it was the same thing at 5:30am. I live in Grandview and for many years have heard gentle train blasts in the night but now the noise is unbearable and I'm getting crabby for being woken up by port noise night after night. On top of that I hear more and more low frequency mechanical noise. This is unacceptable. The City has a noise by-law which seems to be totally ignored. Please let us sleep.

    anonymous asked almost 4 years ago
    Thank you for sharing your concerns with us about nighttime noise. Train whistles are safety devices that alert motorists and pedestrians of an approaching train and warn trespassers away from the rail right-of-way. Locomotive engineers follow Canadian Rail Operating Rules (CROR) that outline when a whistle must be sounded and the whistling sequence to be used. We are also in the midst of setting up a noise monitoring program which will allow us to obtain and record existing noise levels and determine how much noise is attributable to port operations compared with other community noise sources. It will also help us to identify where there might be a noise problem, and if we can make operational improvements to help reduce that noise. We understand that Port operations can sometimes have an impact on our neighbours, and we strive to better understand and, where possible, reduce our impact.
  • Why the incredibly expensive advertising campaign about the port. What is the strategy behind this. It seems ill conceived t spend money buying tv advertising to create good will with the public.

    anonymous asked almost 4 years ago
    What we have heard consistently from the community is that people would like to know more about Port Metro Vancouver and our region’s maritime history. Our advertising campaign is one of several Port initiatives to educate and inform the public about our mandate, operations and our place in the community.

    The current advertising campaign is a continuation of advertising the Port has been doing for some time — we launched informational TV ads with Mark Madryga last year. In our fall advertising campaign, we have chosen to focus our TV ads on stories about the goods we import every day, shore power for cruise ships, and the jobs created in British Columbia by Port activities.

    In addition to advertising, we have increased our social media engagement, launched a mobile app, and created new videos that tell real-life stories of people in our communities and their connections to the Port. We will also continue to use PortTalk.ca as a means to share information with the community and answer questions.

    Thank you for contacting us. Please let us know if you any more questions.
  • With the planned expansion of container capacity at Delta Port and increased coal shipments from Roberts Bank it seems to reason that the current single track railway line will eventually need to be twinned. Therefore, instead of spending millions of Gateway funds to build overpasses through Langley City, would it not be advisable to reroute the track around downtown Langley?

    anonymous asked about 4 years ago
    The Roberts Bank Rail Corridor Program is a series of nine road/rail projects to help alleviate the current and future road/rail conflicts and will help to improve safety and efficiency of both road and rail in the community. As far as we are aware, there are no plans to reroute rail in the future. For more information on the Roberts Bank Rail Corridor Program, please visit www.robertsbankrailcorridor.ca or http://portmetrovancouver.com/en/projects/RobertsBankRailCorridor.aspx.
  • Will you be posting current photos of the LLR project, the ones on the website are from May 2013. When there is traffic congestion due to the road work, drivers are not given enough warning and they are now driving thru the community. You need to position your flaggers or signs at Lonsdale or at Third street prior to Esplanade so traffic is diverted away from local streets and onto the main thoroughfares. There is not enough notification on the radio about this construction project especially at peak travel times.

    tigrib asked over 4 years ago
    Thank you for your comments. We will continue to add progress photos to the website, and plan to add June photos very soon. We will endeavour to post project progress photos of the preceding month within the first two weeks of the following month.

    We currently have changeable message signs at either ends of the project (Esplanade/Lonsdale to the west and Cotton/Gladstone to the east) and have ‘local traffic only’ signs throughout streets within the immediate project area, and we continue to work with the City on the best placement for these signs as the project progresses. Construction for the project generally finishes by 4pm just prior to peak traffic, however for any work that will continue outside this time and will have impacts to local traffic, we will make efforts to include notification to local media – including radio – of this work.
  • Regrettably I missed the PMV AGM. Most of the information I can gather relates to the handling of coal within the Port. Can you tell me if the issue of exorbitant increases to waterlot leases administered by the Port was raised at the AGM and if so, what was Mr. Sylvester's response.

    Strad asked over 4 years ago
    Thanks for your question. The issue of waterlot leases did not come up at our AGM, but we are happy to address your question here. Pressure on land due to commercial and residential development has resulted in rising land values in the Lower Mainland, including on waterlots along the Fraser River. As part of our head lease with the provincial government, Port Metro Vancouver is required by legislation to set waterlot lease rates at market rates. As we have done for 30 years, we use industrial land values as the basis for determining waterlot values, as they best reflect the business of our leaseholders and are much lower than residential and commercial values. Some tenants on the Fraser River have not had a rent increase in more than 10 years. Those tenants currently renewing their leases will see an increase in rent, however we have taken steps to reduce the impact of these increases. In some lease agreements, there is a specified dispute-resolution process through which tenants can request a re-assessment and review of the waterlot value and rent. However, in all cases, we are open to discussing the proposed rent increase, answering any questions and determining if a rent adjustment is possible.
  • In a Global Warming World, is the Port Metro Vancouver equip to sustain unexpected flooding?

    anonymous asked over 4 years ago
    Sea level rise and flood management requires a cohesive, collaborative and coordinated regional approach. We are working with the Fraser Basin Council, along with local, provincial and federal partners to develop a Business Plan for a Regional Flood Management Strategy for the Lower Mainland. We have also sat on the Joint Program Committee for Integrated Flood Hazard Management for many years. This is a multi-party, consensus-based committee that brings together about 30 federal, provincial and local government agencies and organizations to address flood risks in an integrated way.
    In addition, as part of developing a long-term flood management plan we have been contacting neighbouring municipalities to obtain available data, to understand their approach adjacent to Port Metro Vancouver sites and to assess flood risk to Port Metro Vancouver properties under various return periods and flood elevations.
    We are also currently undertaking new topographical surveys that would reflect recent land development and changes to Port Metro Vancouver sites and adjacent areas. The data will be used to update floodplain maps and create a baseline in GIS spatial modeling.
  • I have recently been hearing rumours that subsequent to your AGM, the Board of Port Metro Vancouver voted 7 to 4 against shipping the soft coal dust from Montana and Wyoming, but I have not read or heard any news to this effect in the media. Given your persistent disclaimers that "Decisions on what goods Canada trades with the rest of the world are beyond the scope of a port’s jurisdiction," can you confirm or deny these reports? Thank you for your response, Barbara in Vancouver

    anonymous asked over 4 years ago
    Hi Barbara, thanks for your question. These rumours are not true. Port Metro Vancouver has not had a board meeting since the AGM. To clarify, there may be some confusion between Port Metro Vancouver and Metro Vancouver, the latter of which recently passed a motion about the movement of coal. Metro Vancouver is the regional authority formerly known as the GVRD. Port Metro Vancouver is a port authority operating under Transport Canada's Canada Marine Act.
  • Just looking at your Q & A, and could you tell me why you did not answer the first question from Paul of Richmond? He didn't ask who was on the Board. He asked why First Nations was not on it. On to question 2. Hope you do better with this one.

    Jennifer I Sullivan asked over 4 years ago
    Thanks Jennifer for following up on this important issue. We encourage all individuals with a strong interest in port activity to apply to be on our Board of Directors. While members of First Nations communities are welcome to apply, the Canada Marine Act does not have a designated First Nations appointee position. A change to the Canada Marine Act and the Letters Patent would need to be initiated by the federal Minister of Transportation.
    As an organization, we are working to build strong relationships with First Nations. British Columbia's Lower Mainland is home to a number of First Nations whose traditional territories intersect the lands and waters managed by Port Metro Vancouver. There are many areas of common interest between the Port and First Nation communities, ranging from environmental stewardship to economic development. To build on our shared interests, we actively engage with First Nation communities to seek their involvement in the future growth, operation and stewardship of the Pacific Gateway. We hope to develop lasting collaborative relationships with First Nations around port-related business through initiatives that enhance the Port’s understanding of First Nations’ historical use of the land, foster transparency in Port dealings with First Nation communities to develop trust, and establish formal and flexible consultation processes for port activities. Thus, although there is not a First Nations Board Member, we are building relationships and working together with First Nations in many areas of port activities. For more information about how we work with First Nations, please contact Judy Kitts, our Aboriginal Affairs Advisor at judy.kitts@portmetrovancouver.com.
  • The link to the 'Coal FAQ', in the right sidebar, does not work.http://porttalk.ca/port-talk-consultations?module=qanda&order=recent#tool It goes to an error page.

    anonymous asked over 4 years ago
    Thanks for letting us know. The link is now fixed: http://www.portmetrovancouver.com/docs/default-source/planning/coal-faq-pdf.pdf?sfvrsn=0
  • Why is there not a representative of First Nations on Port Metro Vancouver board? <i>- Paul from Richmond</i>

    PMVAGM asked over 4 years ago
    Port Metro Vancouver’s Board of Directors includes 11 board members, one federal appointee; seven federal appointees recommended by port users; one local municipal appointee; one B.C. provincial appointee; and, in recognition of the Port’s reach beyond the region, one appointee for the Prairie Provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Board appointees are appointed based on their acknowledged and accepted stature within the transportation industry or the business community. For more information on governance and the full requirements in the recruitment of directors, see the Governance section on our website at http://www.portmetrovancouver.com/en/about/corporate/governance.aspx.
  • Section 7.1 of the Port’s “Letters Patent” states its authority to conduct environmental review, but does not offer restrictions to what it can consider in this review. Where in their mandate does it prohibit them from considering CO2 emissions of coal exports? <i>- Sam from Vancouver</i>

    PMVAGM asked over 4 years ago
    Port Metro Vancouver’s Letter’s Patent outlines the Port’s authority to conduct Environmental Assessments within our jurisdiction. The specific section pertaining to environment assessment is 7.1 (j)(a).

    Additionally, as a federal authority, we are required to meet the requirements of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (CEAA 2012) to assess potential adverse environmental effects that are within federal jurisdiction. In regards to Fraser Surrey Docks, the proposed project is not a designated project under CEAA 2012 and does not trigger a federal environmental assessment. However, an environmental assessment is being conducted as it is Port Metro Vancouver’s Environment Policy (and has been since 1991) to undertake environmental assessments of all projects or activities within our management jurisdiction.

    We follow a rigorous environmental review process that mirrors federal requirements, and continue to look for areas for improvement. Our Environment Policy requires us to conduct reviews of all proposed projects, physical works or activities within the Port’s jurisdiction that could have an adverse environmental affect on land, air or water, regardless of the presence of legislated requirements. We take a precautionary approach and uphold a high level of environmental protection within our jurisdiction, to meet and exceed legislative requirements.

    The scope and duration of environmental reviews can vary, depending on the specifics of the proposed initiative and the existing environment or community in which it will occur. Typically, we assess fish and fish habitat, aquatic species, migratory birds, health and socio-economic conditions, physical and cultural heritage, and the current use of lands and resources for traditional purposes.

    Environmental conditions are included as part of any project permit. Some examples include:

    ? All work must comply with the requirements of the Fisheries Act, and all other applicable laws, legislation and best management practices. Note that Section 36(3) of the federal Fisheries Act prohibits the discharge of deleterious substances to waters frequented by fish, including indirectly by storm sewer. Due diligence is required at all times to prevent such discharges; adherence to these conditions does not provide relief from ongoing responsibilities in this regard.
    ? Dust and air emissions associated with project construction and operation shall be managed to avoid health and safety issues on-site, and those and other impacts off-site, as well as to prevent adverse effects on regional and local air quality.
    ? A noise and nuisance management plan will be developed and implemented. Noise monitoring will be conducted to confirm the effectiveness of noise mitigation and low noise initiatives, as described in the noise and nuisance management plan. A copy of the results of the noise monitoring shall be submitted to Port Metro Vancouver.
    ? Appropriate spill prevention, containment and cleanup contingency plan for hydrocarbon products (e.g. fuel, oil, hydraulic fluid) and other deleterious substances should be put in place prior to work commencing.
    ? Appropriate spill containment and cleanup supplies should be kept available on-site whenever the subject works are underway, and personnel working on the project should know the spill cleanup plan and how to deploy the spill response materials.
    ? Excavation works shall be monitored for the presence of contaminants. Should materials be encountered that are suspected to be contaminated, Port Metro Vancouver must be notified immediately.
    ? In the event that archaeological resources are encountered, excavations shall cease immediately and the BC Archaeology Branch and an individual with appropriate archaeological qualifications shall be contacted.
  • What will prevent the soft coal dust from escaping into the air and water, as happens at Prince Rupert port? Can coal be shipped and carried in sealed rail cars? Would this prevent the escape of coal dust? <i>- Barbara from Vancouver</i>

    PMVAGM asked over 4 years ago
    We have been monitoring coal dust at port terminals since the 1970s and uphold the highest and best management practices to mitigate fugitive coal dust on terminals.

    BNSF Railway, which is responsible for transporting coal to the proposed Fraser Surrey Docks (FSD) project, has the following requirements:

    ? All coal shipped on BNSF railcars must be covered with a topper coating or surface stabilizer that has been proven through operations to reduce dust releases by at least 85 per cent compared to an untreated train; and
    ? All coal shipped on BNSF railcars must be loaded in accordance with BNSF’s Load Profile Template, which requires smoothing of the coal such that it is more aerodynamic and less susceptible to loss from wind BNSF’s research and active monitoring have demonstrated that these two approaches effectively address coal dust emissions from rail cars. After unloading at FSD, empty rail cars will be sprayed with water to remove any remaining coal dust prior to the return journey.

    Coal will be unloaded through a series of trap doors that open in the bottom of each rail car and dump the coal from a maximum height of about three feet (just under a metre) into contained shallow receiving pits below the car, in order to minimize potential dust. All unloading will occur in a building with full water misting, which will contain any dust that is emitted through the process.

    Coal will then be transported via a fully covered conveyor system from the unloading pits to the barge loading conveyor. All transfer points within the conveyor system will be fitted with water spray for added dust suppression. Throughout construction and the first year of operations, air quality, including potential coal dust emissions, will be monitored through two Met-one air quality measurement stations. After the first year of operations, the monitoring strategy will be assessed and possibly modified depending on initial results.

    When loading barges at FSD, a dedicated barge loading conveyor will be used to deposit coal from the on-dock conveyor system to the waiting barge. Potential dust emissions will be minimized through use of:

    ? A covered loader, with the ability to limit the drop height between the barge loader and the barge surface;
    ? Barge sidewalls to reduce airflow;
    ? A short direction snorkel, which will be used to reduce coal drop height and related turbulence;
    ? A water spray, as required by weather conditions; and
    ? A wind speed gauge and dust monitor on the tip of the barge loader or immediate vicinity, to allow for real-time monitoring of conditions and to facilitate operations shutdown if an issue is detected.

    There will be no coal storage at FSD during normal operations. FSD has made provisions for an emergency coal stockpile area, which will have a capacity of 30,000 MT, and which could only be used for temporary storage after more than six months of successful operation. In the unlikely event of a logistics chain disruption that leads to the temporary storage of coal at FSD, the coal in the emergency storage pile will be loaded onto the barge before any new coal is received at the facility. Under normal operating conditions, coal would be stored within the temporary stockpile area for less than 48 hours. In addition, there are business incentives for all parties to not stockpile coal.

    If the coal stockpile area is used for temporary storage, potential dust emissions will be mitigated through:
    ? A covered loader, with the ability to limit drop height and therefore reduce turbulence;
    ? Equipment to spray water on the stockpile;
    ? Profiling of the stockpile, to limit height, to a maximum of five metres, and eliminate;
    ? uneven edges that could lead to potential dust emissions; and
    ? A 2.3 metre concrete wall around the stockpile area to reduce air flow. The movement of coal by rail along Canada’s rail corridors is regulated by Transport Canada in accordance with the Railway Act.
  • Given the substantial increase in north-south rail traffic to and from the Port of Vancouver, does the Port have updated projection of rail traffic in the Lower Mainland? Are those estimates in the public domain? If not, will they be made public in support of responsible planning and responsible development for and by the community? <i>- Bruce from Surrey</i>

    PMVAGM asked over 4 years ago
    Port Metro Vancouver plans for the future by working with rail companies to develop projections of rail traffic, in addition to developing commodity forecasts such as the Preliminary Container Traffic Projections report on our website. While some of this data is commercially sensitive, we do share it with regional and provincial transportation agencies in order to develop coordinated plans for transportation and goods movement.

    More information about our commodity forecasts and transportation networks can be found on our website, please visit portmetrovancouver.com/landuseplan.
  • Robin Silvester says hold ups due to train/RD will be eliminated, how is the two-lane bridge going to do that for the next 20 years, especially when port traffic is to increase by a huge percentage? (two-lane bridge being built in the south shore port) <i>- Mark from Vancouver</i>

    PMVAGM asked over 4 years ago
    A number of challenges currently exist along the south shore of Burrard Inlet, affecting the reliability of movement of cargo and people. One of the biggest challenges is the number of at-grade rail crossings – of which there are 10 – which impede traffic and can result in traffic backed up on to residential streets. The new bridge, along with the other initiatives in the South Shore Corridor Project, is designed to address these challenges. The project includes road improvements on Port lands between Heatley Avenue and McGill Street in Vancouver, making it easier and more efficient for port-related traffic to use the Port’s internal road system as much as possible. These improvements are designed to reduce the effects of port operations on local streets as trade within the south shore continues to grow. Without these improvements, congestion is predicted to increase.

    Before construction on the South Shore Corridor Project commenced, the future increase in traffic flow was taken into consideration. All of the different improvements being implemented will mean better access to south shore terminals, while reducing rail and road congestion on local streets. More information about this project can be found on the South Shore Corridor Project website.
  • Why must we accommodate USA coalmines when their own people do not wish it to be transferred to any of their port facilities on their own west coast for health and environmental reasons? <i>- Laura</i>

    PMVAGM asked over 4 years ago
    The proposals in the USA are very different from the proposal at Fraser Surrey Docks (FSD). The proposals in the USA involve building four entirely new terminals in Oregon and Washington, which would handle a total of 130 million tonnes. Because these are entirely new terminals, the approval process is extensive, involving multiple levels of review and far-reaching consultation over many years.

    On the other hand, the proposal at FSD is for an existing terminal to handle a new commodity, within its existing footprint. The FSD proposal is for 4 million tonnes of coal annually. This would result in one additional train per day, and two barges to move the coal to Texada Island.

    Canada and the USA have a close trading relationship and are each others’ largest trading partners. American ports handle Canadian commodities and Canadian ports handle American commodities. This has long been the practice.

    Coal has been safely handled by Port Metro Vancouver marine terminals for decades. Exports are federally regulated and you can find more information on specific goods and technology exports from Canada in Canada’s Export Controls Guide on the Government of Canada website.
  • Who does decide what is suitable and safe to transport through our ports? <i>- Barbara from Vancouver</i>

    PMVAGM asked over 4 years ago
    The Government of Canada determines what products are safe to export and import through the Port. More information on this can be found in Canada’s Export Controls Guide on the Government of Canada website.

    We recognize that some people have concerns about the types of commodities traded through the Port. Our job is to ensure that the cargo that travels through the Port is handled in the safest, most efficient and sustainable way possible, no matter what it may be; however, decisions on what goods Canada trades with the rest of the world is beyond the scope of a port’s jurisdiction. The debate about which commodities Canada trades should take place between citizens, communities and their government.

    Port Metro Vancouver’s mandate is set out in Letter’s Patent pursuant to the Canada Marine Act, and includes contributing to the competitiveness, growth and prosperity of the Canadian economy while providing a high level of safety and environmental protection.
  • What control exactly does Port Metro Vancouver have over what is exported from your port? What steps can be taken to take back control of coal and oil exported, and will you take them? <i>- Kate from Vancouver</i>

    PMVAGM asked over 4 years ago
    The Government of Canada determines what products are safe to export and import through the Port. More information on this can be found in Canada’s Export Controls Guide on the Government of Canada website.

    We recognize that some people have concerns about the types of commodities traded through the Port. Our job is to ensure that the cargo that travels through the Port is handled in the safest, most efficient and sustainable way possible, no matter what it may be; however, decisions on what goods Canada trades with the rest of the world are beyond the scope of a port’s jurisdiction. The debate about which commodities Canada trades should take place between citizens, communities and their government.

    Port Metro Vancouver’s mandate is set out in Letter’s Patent pursuant to the Canada Marine Act, and includes contributing to the competitiveness, growth and prosperity of the Canadian economy while providing a high level of safety and environmental protection.

    The Port has served as Canada’s Pacific Gateway for bulk oil for more than 50 years. All oil tankers calling in Port Metro Vancouver are double-hulled and subject to strict international, national and port authority standards. We are the second largest exporter of coal in North America. We will continue to take every measure to ensure our approach to coal and oil export is both economically and environmentally sustainable.
  • Will Port Metro Vancouver be operating under “broad public support and in the best interest of Canadians” if the expansion of various exports is approved? <i>- Kimberley</i>

    PMVAGM asked over 4 years ago
    The Government of Canada determines what products are safe to export and import through the Port. More information on this can be found in Canada’s Export Controls Guide on the Government of Canada website.

    As a port authority, it is our role to facilitate Canadian trade and to ensure the safe and efficient movement of domestic and international trade. With international demand of Canada’s natural resources growing, the Port is also growing and expanding. Our role is to ensure we can facilitate goods movement in a safe and efficient manner.

    In addition, we have begun work on the development of a Sustainability Vision and Strategy to provide greater detail on what the port looks like in a sustainable world and how we can get there together. You can find out more at http://www.portmetrovancouver.com/en/about/corporate/sustainability.aspx
  • In 2012 Nobel Prize- winning climatologist Andrew Weaver of UVic calculated that climate change from burning coal was far worse than that produced by the Alberta Oil Sands. He stated: “Our overarching conclusion is that as a society we will live or die by our future consumption of coal.” For how many years will Port Metro Vancouver continue to export coal? <i>- S. from Shawnigan Lake</i>

    PMVAGM asked over 4 years ago
    The Government of Canada determines what products are safe to export and import through the Port. More information on this can be found in Canada’s Export Controls Guide on the Government of Canada website.

    We recognize that some people have concerns about the types of commodities traded through the Port. Our job is to ensure that the cargo that travels through the Port is handled in the safest, most efficient and sustainable way possible, no matter what it may be; however, decisions on what goods Canada trades with the rest of the world are beyond the scope of a port’s jurisdiction. The debate about which commodities Canada trades should take place between citizens, communities and their government.

    As a port authority, it is our role to facilitate Canadian trade and to ensure the safe and efficient movement of domestic and international trade. As such, the Port will continue to handle coal for the foreseeable future.
  • You talk about and emphasize financial gains for BC/Canada through Port Economic impacts and taxes/revenues. But port operations do not begin and end at Port Facilities. A more global view must be taken in what we’ve learned re: Climate Change/Global Warming. How do you factor in the cost of mitigation for environmental damage, pollution, health care, costs of which are rising dramatically each year? Do you not feel responsible for mitigation costs? <i>- Dianne from Surrey</i>

    PMVAGM asked over 4 years ago
    Port Metro Vancouver is committed to long-term sustainability and we work hard to minimize our environmental footprint. Reducing our emissions now, and as we grow, will help to maintain good air quality and reduce the impacts of climate change for future generations. Port Metro Vancouver as an organization has been carbon neutral since 2010. We report on this annually in our Sustainability Report, which is externally assured by third party auditors.

    As part of our Air Action Program, we have been working to reduce air emissions of criteria contaminants, air toxins and greenhouse gases from port activities. We were the first port in Canada to have an Environmental Programs Department, the first in North America to implement a mid-ocean ballast water exchange program, the first in Canada to install shore power for cruise ships, and one of only two ports in the world to issue an externally assured, B+ level Global Reporting Initiative Sustainability Report.

    We have also developed programs and partnerships that extend beyond our jurisdiction. An example of this collaboration is the Northwest Ports Clean Air Strategy. In partnership with the Port of Seattle and Port of Tacoma, we developed the Northwest Ports Clean Air Strategy for emission-reduction performance goals from port-related sources. The Strategy improves air quality and reduces contributions to climate change in the shared Georgia Basin Puget Sound air shed.

    We’re also committed to applying a high standard when considering developments on port land. Last year alone, we conducted 210 environmental assessments. We conduct environmental impact assessments regardless of whether a project triggers Canadian Environmental Assessment Act 2012. We want to continue to grow as a business, but are ensuring local performance costs are sustainable and responsible. Further information on these policies can be found in our Sustainability Report on our website, please visit http://www.portmetrovancouver.com/en/about/corporate/accountability.aspx
  • How much will global CO2 emissions increase if planned coal port expansion goes ahead (as a result of coal shipped through FSD)? How many new jobs will be created by the FSD coal expansion? <i>- Blaise from Victoria</i>

    PMVAGM asked over 4 years ago
    The proposed Fraser Surrey Docks (FSD) project will create approximately 50 new jobs for the local community. Regarding CO2 emissions, FSD conducted an air quality assessment for the Environmental Impact Assessment component of their proposal. Results indicated minimal air quality impacts in and around the FSD facility and transport routes. You can read the full report on the FSD Direct Transfer Coal Facility project page on our website at http://www.portmetrovancouver.com/projects.aspx.

    Additionally, in compliance with the Northwest Ports Clean Air Strategy (a joint air-quality initiative between the Ports of Tacoma and Seattle and Port Metro Vancouver), in-depth reviews are conducted every five years to ensure air quality measures are in proper practice. To learn more, visit our website at http://www.portmetrovancouver.com/en/environment.aspx
  • Will climate change at sea level rise have an impact on Port Metro Vancouver and its clients’ bottom line? How does Port Metro Vancouver intend to address this? <i>- Paul from Richmond</i>

    PMVAGM asked over 4 years ago
    Sea level rise and flood management requires a cohesive, collaborative and coordinated regional approach. We are working with the Fraser Basin Council, along with local, provincial and federal partners to develop a Business Plan for a Regional Flood Management Strategy for the Lower Mainland. We have also sat on the Joint Program Committee for Integrated Flood Hazard Management for many years. This is a multi-party, consensus-based committee that brings together about 30 federal, provincial and local government agencies and organizations to address flood risks in an integrated way.

    In addition, as part of developing a long-term flood management plan we have been contacting neighbouring municipalities to obtain available data, to understand their approach adjacent to Port Metro Vancouver sites and to assess flood risk to Port Metro Vancouver properties under various return periods and flood elevations.

    We are also currently undertaking new topographical surveys that would reflect recent land development and changes to Port Metro Vancouver sites and adjacent areas. The data will be used to update floodplain maps and create a baseline in GIS spatial modeling.
  • Of the dollars invested in trade, how much is devoted to sustainable, long-term trade or products that are less harmful to the environment and global warming? Will there be dollars invested towards sustainability in the future to meet our climate targets? <i>- Amy from Surrey</i>

    PMVAGM asked over 4 years ago
    The Government of Canada determines what products are safe to export and import through the Port. More information on this can be found in Canada’s Export Controls Guide on the Government of Canada website.

    We recognize that some people have concerns about the types of commodities traded through the Port. As a port authority, our job is to ensure that the cargo that travels through the Port is handled in the safest, most efficient way possible, no matter what it may be. Decisions on what goods Canada trades with the rest of the world are beyond the scope of a port’s jurisdiction.

    Within Port Metro Vancouver’s jurisdiction, we are exploring opportunities to reduce emissions and improve port performance through a number of initiatives, including reducing criteria air contaminant emissions, implementing air and energy action initiatives and encouraging environmental stewardship through our Blue Circle award program.

    The movement of goods is an energy-intensive process requiring heavy industrial equipment that is primarily powered by diesel fuel – this fuel consumption impacts regional air quality and contributes to climate change. Though port activities are an important source of emissions, they account for less than 5 per cent of the region’s total air emissions.

    Significant improvements have been made by industry to reduce air contaminant emissions over recent years. For example, since 2005, diesel particulate matter emissions have decreased steadily, despite an increase in port activity throughput. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions remains a challenge because technological improvements in fuel efficiency cannot keep pace with anticipated growth. We believe alternative energy is required to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in port activities, and we are actively exploring the topic with our customers, stakeholders and governments to advance this opportunity.

    In addition, we have begun work on the development of a Sustainability Vision and Strategy to provide greater detail on what the port looks like in a sustainable world and how we can get there together. You can find out more at http://www.portmetrovancouver.com/en/about/corporate/sustainability.aspx
  • Why does Port Metro Vancouver NOT recognize global carbon emissions as an essential issue it could address? <i>- Paul from Richmond</i>

    PMVAGM asked over 4 years ago
    We are exploring opportunities to reduce emissions and improve port performance through a number of initiatives, including reducing criteria air contaminant emissions, implementing air and energy action initiatives and encouraging environmental stewardship through our Blue Circle award program.

    The movement of goods is an energy-intensive process requiring heavy industrial equipment that is primarily powered by diesel fuel – this fuel consumption impacts regional air quality and contributes to climate change. Though port activities are an important source of emissions, they account for less than 5 per cent of the region’s total air emissions.

    Port-related emissions can be attributed to four primary activities: vessel, truck and rail movement, and cargo handling equipment used at terminals to load and unload cargo. Within these activities, we measure criteria air contaminants that affect air quality and greenhouse gases that contribute to climate change. Diesel soot (exhaust from diesel engines) is one form of particulate matter that is of particular concern, as exposure has been identified as a serious risk to human health.

    Significant improvements have been made by industry to reduce air contaminant emissions over recent years. For example, since 2005, diesel particulate matter emissions have decreased steadily, despite an increase in port activity throughput. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions remains a challenge because technological improvements in fuel efficiency cannot keep pace with anticipated growth. We believe alternative energy is required to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in port activities, and we are actively exploring the topic with our customers, stakeholders and governments to advance this opportunity.

    More information on our environmental initiatives and preservation of air quality in the region are available in frequently asked questions of the environment section of our website, please visit http://www.portmetrovancouver.com/en/environment.aspx

    In addition, we have begun work on the development of a Sustainability Vision and Strategy to provide greater detail on what the port looks like in a sustainable world and how we can get there together. You can find out more at http://www.portmetrovancouver.com/en/about/corporate/sustainability.aspx
  • Climate science predicts that continued fossil fuel use will lead to catastrophic climate change and associated civil distribution – at a minimum. How can you “balance” economic development (meaning fossil fuel exports) with the best interests of Canadians? <i>- Michael from Vancouver</i>

    PMVAGM asked over 4 years ago
    We are developing a Sustainability Vision and Strategy, which will help us determine what a port looks like in a sustainable world. Port Metro Vancouver as an organization has been carbon neutral since 2010. We report on this annually in our Sustainability Report, which is externally assured by third party auditors. For more information, please visit our website at: http://www.portmetrovancouver.com/en/about/corporate/sustainability.aspx.

    Port Metro Vancouver is committed to long-term sustainability and we work hard to minimize our environmental footprint. Reducing our emissions now, and as we grow, will help to maintain good air quality and reduce the impacts of climate change for future generations. As part of our Air Action Program, we have been working to reduce air emissions of criteria contaminants, air toxins and greenhouse gases from port activities. We were the first port in Canada to have an Environmental Programs Department, the first in North America to implement a mid-ocean ballast water exchange program, the first in Canada to install shore power for cruise ships, and one of only two ports in the world to issue an externally assured, B+ level Global Reporting Initiative Sustainability Report.

    We have also developed programs and partnerships that extend beyond our jurisdiction. An example of this collaboration is the Northwest Ports Clean Air Strategy. In partnership with the Port of Seattle and Port of Tacoma, we developed the Northwest Ports Clean Air Strategy for emission-reduction performance goals from port-related sources. The Strategy improves air quality and reduces contributions to climate change in the shared Georgia Basin Puget Sound air shed. For more information, please visit our website at http://www.portmetrovancouver.com/en/environment.aspx.

    We’re also committed to applying a high standard when considering developments on port land. Last year alone, we conducted 210 environmental assessments. We conduct environmental impact assessments regardless of whether a project triggers Canada Environmental Assessment Act 2012. We want to continue to grow as a business, but are ensuring local performance costs are sustainable and responsible. Further information on these policies can be found in our Sustainability Report on our website, please visit http://www.portmetrovancouver.com/en/about/corporate/accountability.aspx.
  • I find your website does misleading. You mention 1 extra coal train a day where most other sources mention 6 trains a day. With each train being 175 cars long this is significant. You also do not mention that each of the these trains round trip. The train runs through Burns Bog which is protected land. You don't seem to be considering this fact. Also, coal is a short term energy solution that is not sustainable. You are making a decision that will have severe impacts on people's health and quality of life based on short term monetary gains only. (you may have realized there is no question here-this is a statement that I hope you will consider when making your decision about expanding the Surrey Port)

    anonymous asked over 4 years ago
    Thank you for visiting PortTalk. We appreciate your input about the proposed Fraser Surrey Docks project, and will consider your comments during the project review process which is currently taking place. This project will not be approved until Port Metro Vancouver has reviewed all the community input and the required technical studies, and are certain that all the identified impacts can be mitigated. For more information, please refer to our FAQ about coal.
  • Port Metro Vancouver, where are all of the other comments from citizens that you mentioned in the Annual General Meeting this Tuesday? You promised to post them and your responses on this forum?

    anonymous asked over 4 years ago
    We apologize for the delay. We are working to transcribe the questions and will post them, along with the responses, on the website shortly. Thanks for your patience.
  • I live in Surrey. I am very concerned about the idea that more trains carrying coal may be traveling through this community. I have concerns about traffic, accessibility to beaches and businesses along White Rock and Crescent Beach waterfront and safety. Of course I am concerned about air quality as the coal dust settles on the community but I am also very concerned about the fact that we may be shipping a lot of coal to Asian countries to burn to pollute the air that will drift back to us across the Pacific Ocean for us to breathe. Good science says we need to slow down or stop burning coal as opposed to increasing its use. My question is not about how this coal will be handled but to ask that it not be handled at all. Common sense says leave it in the ground.

    anonymous asked over 4 years ago
    Thank you for sharing your thoughts. Climate change is a concern for everyone, and we appreciate the time you took to write to us. Port Metro Vancouver is striving to be more sustainable by implementing programs that improve local air quality, such as Shore Power, and maintaining a rigorous project review process that assesses a range of considerations such as impacts on air quality, traffic, and noise and ensures products can be moved safely and sustainably. As a port authority, it is our role to facilitate Canadian trade and to ensure that the products that Canada imports and exports, are moved safely and efficiently through this port with minimal impact to the environment and the surrounding community. We do not decide international trade policies that control what can or cannot be exported. The issue of how to address climate change, and the resulting economic, social and environmental impacts, requires further dialogue and collaboration between citizens, industry, all levels of government.
  • I live in New Westminster. This is a high density residential neighborhood that is undergoing renaissance, growth and expansion. Many young families are locatinig here. Why would you even consider putting residents' health at risk by enabling the handling and transmission of US mined coal in the middle of such a neighborhood? Have you looked into why the American people refuse to have this coal handled in their own ports? Why do you think we should suffer the risks that they refuse to take on themselves?

    anonymous asked over 4 years ago
    Thanks for your question, John. We have developed an FAQ document that addresses many of the concerns you are raising and provides more information about the proposed project at Fraser Surrey Docks. Please let me know if you have additional comments.
  • Where can we find project updates regarding the low level road in North Vancouver? There has been a mass de-forestation on third street, and I can't find anywhere on your site that tells me what's going on, or what to expect next.

    anonymous asked over 4 years ago
    Thanks for your interest in the Low Level Road project. You can find more information on the LLR page on PortTalk or on the project page of our website.
  • Does the Port Metro Vancouver have any plans to change the port at Fraser Wharves from a auto port to any other Port in the foreseeable future?

    anonymous asked over 4 years ago
    For the foreseeable future, Fraser Wharves will continue to operate the terminal under a leaseback arrangement from Port Metro Vancouver. There are no plans for a change of use at this time. The purchase of the Fraser Wharves facility ensures terminal capacity continues to be available for port activity. For more information, please review the Q&A below.
  • Has the vancouver port authority purchased fraser wharves land and building and leased it back the the company?

    anonymous asked over 4 years ago
    Thanks for your question. In June 2012, Fraser Wharves commenced a competitive bidding process for the sale of the property and, in December 2012, Fraser Wharves and Port Metro Vancouver reached agreement for a Purchase & Sale. On March 15, 2013, Fraser Wharves Ltd. sold its real estate interests in the 65.62 acre property located at 13800 & 14000 Steveston Highway, Richmond, BC, to Port Metro Vancouver. The purchase of the Fraser Wharves facility ensures terminal capacity continues to be available for port activity. A change in use is not expected at this time. For now, Fraser Wharves will continue to operate the terminal under a leaseback arrangement from Port Metro Vancouver.
  • 'Hi, i am a student of Plymouth UK. where can i find the data relating to Port Metro Vancouve's shipping data. the requirement is as follow: 1.select any one specific port for which u can access data, List the main operations it undertakes relating to award title ie one of international 1.shipping;2.logistics;3.supply chain management; 4. procurement. 2.apply Parnaby's input output analysis to creatively analyse the problem of sustainably managing ONE of the operations you identified in (1) and explain the analysis. can u provide a links which can connect to the data. Kind regard'

    Longines asked over 4 years ago
    Thanks for your interest in Port Metro Vancouver. More details about the Port’s shipping and cargo statistics can be found on our website at the Facts and Stats page. Good luck with your research!
  • What Railway company will carry the coal from the us to Port Metro Vancouver once the upgrades are in place

    kimberly maxwell asked about 3 years ago

    Thank you for getting in touch with us. In response to your question, coal will be shipped from the United States to Fraser Surrey Docks along the existing BNSF rail line. The project will result in one additional train per day. Currently, approximately nine to 10 trains travel along the BNSF rail line a day.

    If you have any further questions related to this project or other Port Metro Vancouver activities, please feel free to contact us. A member of our team will be happy to assist you.


  • With increasing regularity, volume, and duration a siren has been going off at all times of the day and night at the Port of Vancouver. I believe this is from the Vanterm facility. Judging by the non effort to call me back on this issue I am starting to think that you consider this a simple "noise of a working port" problem and not worth your time. Please note that I live well away from Vanterm in North Vancouver (lower Lonsdale) and certainly see this as a problem that needs addressing now. If you say this is a safety issue I would like to point out that I am several kilometers away and am in no immediate danger of injury. I suspect the horns involved are pointed out across the water rather than pointing to the area of risk within Vanterm. Appropriate design and engineering would keep your workers safe and remove the blanketing of Lower Lonsdale with penetrating noise. Highly direction siren technologies now exist if the problem is more complex than I have suggested. Please address this issue.

    Michael asked about 3 years ago

    Thank you for posting your concerns to PortTalk. We understand you have since received a response from community feedback staff but have included some information below in case others are impacted by the same issue. 

    While TSI-Vanterm's rail safety siren is required for worker safety we have heard from the community that it is excessive. Management is aware of the issue and will look at what long-term opportunities exist that may help lessen its impacts.

    Should you wish to register a complaint, please contact community.feedback@portmetrovancouver.com.

  • After seven years living in the Lower Lonsdale area I'm fed up with the noise coming from the Vanterm facility. It is absolutely unacceptable to have Vanterm's rail safety sirens going off as loud as it does at all times of the day and evening. I can assure you that if I'm being woken up at 2:00am, 4:00 am then your rail workers will be able to hear it quite well. I'm sure your team will be able to figure out a way to lessen the noise so it doesn't travel across the inlet, waking people up in the Lower Lonsdale area at all hours in the morning (I can assure you my safety isn't in jeopardy) and make sure your workers' safety isn't compromised. It is infuriating, completely unacceptable and unnecessary.

    kwickerson asked about 3 years ago

    While TSI-Vanterm's rail safety siren is required for worker safety we have heard from the community that it is excessive. Management is aware of the issue and will look at what long-term opportunities exist that may help lessen its impacts. Please contact community.feedback@portmetrovancouver.com for more information or to register a complaint. 

  • Good morning Which is the rate handling in the port of Vancouver for a container of 20' Thanks

    cokeescobar95 asked almost 3 years ago


    Thanks for visiting PortTalk.  All of Port Metro Vancouver's rates and fees are available in our 2014 Fee Document.